Cascade Geographic Society's 
SUMMER Tours

 

IMPORTANT NOTE: Participants must be prepared to begin on time and bring the following: sack lunch (if complimentary lunch is not included in the fee) & snacks; $10 for museum admissions or tour fees, if needed; extra money in case of emergencies; proper dress and shoes to fit the weather conditions & season; & camera & film -- optional.

Please note regarding payment for classes: make out one check to the Cascade Geographic Society. Please call (503) 622-4798 (Michael P. Jones) or (503) 658-6233 (Nita Kreuzer) for information or registration.

There are two categories of tours, Yearly and Seasonal.  The first category (Yearly) are those tours which are offered on a fairly consistent basis and will likely be offered again next year. The second category (Seasonal) are those that are offered just this Summer. 


 

Cascade Geographic Society's

Summer 2005 Tours

 

 

 

 

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Beyond the Classroom:

Cultural, Historical &

Natural Heritage Programs

Offered Through the

"Oregon Trail Education Center"

 

 

Tours, Workshops, & Excursions of the

Cascade Geographic Society

 

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_______________________________________

 

We do not have a minimum enrollment number, so we almost

never cancel our tours.  Preregistration is encouraged,

but you may also register on site at the meeting place

if you first contact us just in case there are any updates you need to know or if there are changes in the meeting place(s) or time(s).

Call (503) 622-4798 for registration and information.

 

Cascade Geographic Society

mailing address:  P.O. Box 398, Rhododendron, Oregon  97049.

email:  cgsmthood@onemain.com

website:  www.members.com/cgs-mthood

_______________________________________

 

 

 

 

~ Summer 2005 Tours ~

 

 

            Aurora Colony:  Oregon Trail & Willamette Valley Settlement History

Tour Leader:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.            Fee:   CGS Members = $30/Non-CGS Members = #40

Date, Time, & Meeting Place:  (Thursday) July 7th (9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) at Carnegie Art Center, 606 John Adams, Oregon City, Oregon.

      Few towns or settlements the Willamette Valley or anywhere in the Northwest can compare to the history of the Aurora Colony.  From its initial settlement by Native American, then by French-Canadian trappers and their Indian wives, and later by Oregon Trail emigrants, and, finally, by a German religious commune, its past is not only fascinating, but an ideal source for studying and exploring the history of the Old Oregon Country.  This class will explore the well-known and little-known history of this village that played a significant role in the development of frontier agriculture and cottage industries in what was known as the "New Eden".  Studied will be the follower's way of life, traditions, religious beliefs, cultural practices, architecture, and folklore.  Participants will explore the same places where these early settlers interacted with the indigenous populations, the fur traders, the Oregon Trail emigrants, and those traveling by steamboat, stagecoach, and, still later, by train.

 

            Oregon Trail & Fur Trade Settlements of the Lower Willamette Valley

Instructor:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.                 Fee:  CGS Members = $25/Non-CGS Members = #30

Date, Time, & Meeting Place:  (Friday) July 8th (9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) at Carnegie Art Center, 606 John Adams, Oregon City, Oregon.

      The Oregon Trail and fur trade-era settlements in the lower Willamette Valley represent a rich heritage awaiting to be explored.  Aurora Colony, Oregon City, Canby, Canemah, Gladstone, Milwaukie, Sucker (today's Lake Oswego), Hubbard, Champoeg, Butteville, St. Paul, St. Louis, Gervais, Mission Landing, Newberg, Yamhill, Portland, and others are inter-related with the overland emigration, the early days of the fur trade, missionaries, and homesteading history.  Class participants will explore the history and related important sites of this "New Eden", by studying the relationship of settlement and statehood to Manifest Destiny, religious purposes, and economic incentives, as well as learning about multi-cultural interactions with indigenous people, including the impact of disease impacts on Native Americans, the cultural and religious sites that were destroyed by this early-day development, the treaties made and broken, the Indian wars, and more. 

 

      LOLO PASS Heritage Trail:  MT. HOOD'S Nearly Forgotten OREGON TRAIL

Instructor:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.                 Fee:  CGS Members = $25/Non-CGS Members = #30

Date, Time, & Meeting Place:  (Tuesday) July 12th (9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) at "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 East Welches Road (at junction of Welches Road & Stage Stop Road), Village of Welches, Oregon.

The Cascade Mountains proved to be an infamous obstacle to those Oregon Trail pioneers who sought to get to the Willamette Valley by by-passing the difficult and expensive raft trip down the Columbia River.  Mt. Hood's Native American trails provided the only possible route for these Eden-seeking emigrants, but each and every step was plagued with danger.   Prior to Samuel K. Barlow opening a toll road around the Mountain's southern flank in 1846, the "overlanders" were forced to travel over an Ancient Indian path along the northern side of the 11,235-foot peak.  Known as the "Walk-Up Trail" and, later, the ‘"Daniel

Lee Cattle Trail", this route was so rugged that no covered wagon were said ever to have made it over this path.  Instead, those early travelers either rode horseback or walked in

order to reach their destination that lay somewhere in the west.  This class will take participants to various historic sites and routes associated with this little-known trail, from the Village of Zig Zag to Lost Lake in Hood River Valley.  This is a special excursion where you will learn about the Indians, their history and mythology, the fur traders and Mountain Men, Lewis and Clark, miners, homesteaders, and early-day Forest Rangers and loggers, all of whom played a role in this special passage through the Cascade Mountains. 

  

 

 

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      Historic Columbia River Highway Heritage Excursions

Tour Leader:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.             Fee:  CGS Members = $25/Non-CGS Members = #30 

Date, Time, & Meeting Place:  (Wednesday) July 13th (9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) inside the Cascade Cafe at the northeast corner of the Columbia Gorge Factory Outlet Stores, Troutdale, Oregon.

      The Old Columbia River Highway was constructed between the years of 1913 to 1915, and was a replacement to the Native American and pioneer trails that passed through this special gorge that was possessed with scenic and geologic  marvels.  This class explores that historic roadway and history of the Columbia River through an educational excursion. This highway was not only considered an early-day engineering wonder as it etched its way through a rugged gorge created by volcanic upheavals, but is considered to be one of the most beautiful scenic roadways in all of the world.  From the mouth of the Sandy River eastward to Multnomah Falls, participants will venture forth, learning about the many special cultural, historical, and natural sites and features that depict the history of American Indians, the Euro-American explorers, the fur traders, the Oregon Trail pioneers, the homesteaders and miners, as well as the early-day tourist providers and recreationalists, and the history of this special road.  Visit waterfalls, scenic vistas, historic buildings and towns, natural areas, pioneer sites, and much more, as this historic highway unfolds before you while new ideas and information are shared with you.  A most unique way to learn while exploring.

 

MT. Hood Volcanic Landscapes

Tour Leader:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.             Fee:  CGS Members = $25/Non-CGS Members = #30 

Date, Time, & Meeting Place:  (Thursday) July 14th (9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) at "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 East Welches Road (at junction of Welches Road & Stage Stop Road), Village of Welches, Oregon.

      135 million years ago the Cascade Mountain Range rose out of a primeval sea that covered what is now the State of Oregon.  Volcanic activity began 36 million years ago.  The 11,235-foot Mount Hood was born 13 million years ago as a storm of fire and molten lava heaved up its impressive presence on the rugged Cascade skyline.  Since that time, this Mountain, which was called Wy'East, has been enshrined in the rich mythology and legends of Native Americans as it continued to periodically smoke, shake, and erupt.  In 1805-1806, the Lewis and Clark Expedition found evidence of a recent eruption along the Sandy River, which had literally buried entire forests which later became known as "Ghost Forests".  And during the days of the Oregon Trail, frightened emigrants traveling over the Mountain's southern flank on the Barlow Trail witnessed bouts of fire and smoke exploding from this cantankerous snow-clad Peak.  Today, Mt. Hood remains in an active but "sleeping" state, with geologists predicting a major eruption within the next 30 years.  With its past eruptions and rich heritage of indigenous people, the educational opportunities are literally unlimited.  This class explores some of the indigenous oral traditions associated with Mt. Hood and its volcanic landscape through a series of interpretative tours that will link its diversified multi-cultural history with the near-secret "Ghost Forests" and their picturesque beauty.

 

            Columbia River Gorge  Heritage:  Petroglyphs, Petrographs,

& Native American Cultural landscapes

Tour Leader:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.             Fee:  CGS Members = $35/Non-CGS Members = #45 

Date, Time, & Meeting Place:  (Friday) July 15th (8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.) inside the Cascade Cafe at the northeast corner of the Columbia Gorge Factory Outlet Stores (in front of Mikasa), Troutdale, Oregon.

      The heritage of the Columbia River Gorge is just as important as its world-reknowned scenery and geologic wonders that draw many millions of tourists and recreationalists each year.  This spectacular natural landscape has over 10,000 years of Native American history interwoven with special heritage sites that represent a unique and fascinating history worthy of exploration.  Participants will visit petroglyph and petrograph sites, areas that were utilized by the Lewis and Clark "Corps of Discovery" during the years of 1805-1806, pioneer forts, scenic vistas, special natural areas, and more.  A special focus will be on indigenous culture, religion, oral traditions, and the role of the salmon in their culture, way of life, and survival.  Participants will explore a wealth of heritage treasures.

 

 

 

 

 

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Oregon TRAIL Heritage Sites:  MT. HOOD’s westside

Tour Leader:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.             Fee:  CGS Members = $25/Non-CGS Members = #35 

Date, Time, & Meeting Place:  (Tuesday) July 19th (9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) at "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 East Welches Road (at junction of Welches Road & Stage Stop Road), Village of Welches, Oregon.

                 The Oregon Trail segments that traversed over Mt. Hood were the most difficult in all of the 2,000-plus miles of this difficult path that was utilized by the overland emigrants.  Known as the "Barlow Trail", danger seemed to lurk at each and every step, although its most infamous site was Big Laurel Hill where travellers were forced to lower ther wagons with ropes down steep cliffs.  However, other places along this route were just as dangerous and claimed an equal number of lives.  Yet, it was promoted to be a relatively reasonable, not to mention cheaper, alternative, to the Columbia River to get to the "New Eden" (the Willamette Valley).  Today, over 150 years later, you can still follow in the wake of these pioneers and stand in their "footprints" as you study the incredible history of this crude path first hand.  Learn about the rich multi-cultural history, which dates back to some ten thousand years of Native American use prior to the coming of the first whites.  Participants will visit near-forgotten grave sites, stream “fords”, places where the original wheel ruts and swales have left their mark upon the natural landscape, and many other special sites.  This class that will enhance how you teach the Oregon Trail in your classroom, and will provide a wealth of information to re-energize your curriculum. 

 

            Oregon TRAIL Migration, Settlement, & Graveyards of

MT. HOOD’s eAstern Flank

Tour Leader:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.             Fee:  CGS Members = $35/Non-CGS Members = #45 

Date, Time, & Meeting Place:  (Wednesday) July 20th (9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) at "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 East Welches Road (at junction of Welches Road & Stage Stop Road), Village of Welches, Oregon.

      The infamous Oregon Trail segment over Mount Hood --- known as the "Barlow Trail" --- became famous as well as infamous amongst travelers migrating to the Willamette Valley.  The trail follows a dangerous scenic route from the Columbia River through settlements such as Dufur, Tygh Valley, and Wamic, and then traverses the terrain to Smock Prairie and then up the mountain's rugged eastern landscape to White River, Devil's Half Acre, and Barlow Pass. Utilized by Native Americans for its first ten thousand years, over 150 years ago it became the first toll road over the Cascade Mountain Range.  This class will guide its participants on a special interpretative excursion over this historic wilderness path, guiding them to a former tollgate, campsites, little-known routes, cabin sites, solitary graves and cemeteries, in addition to an old frontier hotel, pioneer schoolhouse, an octagon barn, and much more.  This is an opportunity to travel to some little-known sections of the Oregon Trail from the comfort of your car, while learning about the terrible ordeal that thousands of emigrants had to endure in order to reach the Willamette Valley.  This is an ideal way to learn about history firsthand, while acquiring many new ideas for your classroom. 

 

SHANGHAI tunnels of Old Portland:  Exploring A Hidden & Infamous Waterfront History

Tour Leader:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.             Fee:  CGS Members = $50/Non-CGS Members = #75 

Date, Time, & Meeting Place:  (Friday) July 22nd (10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.) at Mall 205, in the parking lot outside of Baja Fresh, Portland, Oregon.

      "Portland Underground" has an infamous history that has survived the passage of time and the progress of change. Solidly-constructed tunnels, fashioned out of stone and brick and built during the time buildings were constructed, still "snake" their presence beneath the streets of Old Portland, and represent an important and shocking piece of the history of the West Coast shanghai trade that earned the "City of Roses" the dubious reputation of being "the worst port in the world".  This class reveals a hidden, and little-known, but very intriguing history of maritime trade in "human cargo" through a series of explorations of this "Underground" that is made up of silent cells, trap doors, and catacombs that link darkened basements and historic landmarks with the past that has not yet found its way into the history books.  This class allows you to explore the remnants of a little-told history of human rights violations at its absolute worst.  From the 1850's to as late as the 1940's, unsuspecting victims learned first hand about the "darkness and shadows" of this river town that hid its corruption well.  Individuals who frequented places of vice, such as saloons, gambling parlors, opium dens, and other establishments of lesser reputations, would be given "knock-

~5~

 

 

SHANGHAI tunnels of Old Portland (continued)

 

out drops" or find themselves dropped through trapdoors into basements, where they were held hostage in make-shift cells, until, finally, they were taken through tunnels out to the wharfs and sold to sea captains bound for the Orient.  So many were sold for “blood money” that Portland became the "Shanghai Capital of the World".  Participants will venture into the remants of the "Underground" that has survived, along with their oral history, and experience a unique piece of the past.  You'll never view the history of Portland and the West Coast the same as you explore this "skullduggerry" that also included bootlegging, white slavery, and opium smuggling. 

 

Northwest Heritage Landscapes:  Native American History, Culture, & Mythology of the Natural World

Tour Leader:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.             Fee:  CGS Members = $25/Non-CGS Members = #35 

      Date, Time, & Meeting Place:  (Tuesday) July 26th (9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) at Mall 204 in front of "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 East Welches Road (at junction of Welches Road & Stage Stop Road), Village of Welches, Oregon.

            The Northwest is possessed with some of the most beautiful natural areas in all of the world.  However, this beautiful scenery represents more than just beauty, but also possesses the rich heritage of Northwest Indian history, culture, and mythology.  This class brings the participants to some of these special places and allows one to  explore the stories that dates back to over a 10,000-plus years and illustrates the role that the natural physical environment played in the day-to-day way of life of indigenous people and in their culture and religion.  Visitations to various sites will be made, in addition to traveling sections of ancient paths that pre-dates westwart migration.  Also studied will be The laws that protect archaeological and cultural sites will also be studied, as well as the politics of protecting sacred sites, the methods used to evaluate natural sites for cultural heritage (such as wetlands, riparian areas, rock outcroppings, meadows), etc.  Learn how to integrate this information back  into the classroon learning environments.  Offered in cooperation by Portland State University and Cascade Geographic Society.      

 

Native American POTLATCHing in the Northwest

Tour Leader:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.             Fee:  CGS Members = $25/Non-CGS Members = #35

Date, Time, & Meeting Place:  (Wednesday) July 27th (9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) at Mall 204 in front of "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 East Welches Road (at junction of Welches Road & Stage Stop Road), Village of Welches, Oregon.

      Potlatching has long been a cultural tradition in the Northwest amongst the indigenous populations. This class focuses on these historical traditions of “giving”, blending together Native American storytelling, art, and artifacts with these early cultures.  Participants will learn how artwork and carvings, that depict the myths and legends of the people, are interwoven into these special ceremonies, often times telling the history of the family.  They will also learn about the role of storytelling in one’s life, how to gather and develop stories, how to understand the role of art in oral tradition, and experience the telling of these myths and legends in a replica of a Northwest Indian plank lodge.  They will also learn about the First People's culture of giving and how this affected the status of an individual and their family in the tribe.  This is a unique way to develop new ideas. 

 

Frontier & Living History Experience

Tour Leader:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.             Fee:  CGS Members = $35/Non-CGS Members = #50

Date, Time, & Meeting Place:  (Thursday) July 28th (9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) at "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 East Welches Road (at junction of Welches Road & Stage Stop Road), Village of Welches, Oregon.

      The settlers of the Old Oregon Country had to adapt to living within a changing Wilderness that taxed their endurance and challenged their physical strength.  However, they learned quickly that their survival was also based upon the intelligence that they adapted in doing their daily tasks and chores. This class allows the participants to experience some of the duties that pioneers employed in the course of their workday.  From candle- and soap-making to blacksmithing, splitting shakes, cutting wood with a bowsaw and crosscut saw, fashioning furniture with a foot-powered lathe, and other old-fangled skills.  Learn what life was like during the settlement of the “New Eden”, the customs of the times, farm festivals, superstitions, what going to school and churches was like, customs, folklore and folkways, village life, and much more.

 

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Lewis & Clark on the Pacific Coast

Tour Leader:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.             Fee:  CGS Members = $35/Non-CGS Members = #45

Date, Time, & Meeting Place:  (Saturday) July 30th (10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.) outside the front door at the Columbia River Maritime Museum at 1792 Marine Drive in Astoria, Oregon.

      The history of the Lewis and Clark Expedition on the Pacific Coast will be explored through this class, which will take the participants to places of history that werecaptured in their journals.  A primary focus will be on the rich multi-cultural heritage of those indigenous people living at the mouth of the Columbia River and along the Pacific Ocean with whom they came into contact during their stay in this area during the Winter of 1805-1806. Participants will visit a wide variety of sites which include the Northwest Maritime Musueum, Fort Clatsop, Fort Columbia, Fort Stevens, the Lewis and Clark Interpretative Center, the Astoria Column, and other sites.  The class will provide educators with the opportunity to develop resources for their classroom, as well as field trip opportunities.  The emphasis will be on gathering information and ideas for cross-curriculum classroom projects.

 

Lewis & Clark Discovery Journey:  Heritage Explorations

of Washington's Pacific Coast

Tour Leader:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.             Fee:  CGS Members = $35/Non-CGS Members = #45

Date, Time, & Meeting Place:  (Sunday) July 31st (10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.) outside the front door of the Ilwaco Heritage Museum at 115 S.E. Lake Street in Ilwaco, Washington.

          Explore the rich heritage sites of Washington's Pacific Coast where the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery camped, hunted, and traded with the Native Americans during their arrival at this destination during the years 1805-1806.  You'll also study the indigenous people who inhabited the Long Beach Peninsula, and Shoalwater and Willapa Bays, with a focus on their ways of life, art, mythology, and religion.  You'll learn about the Euro-American explorers and the maritime fur traders who came before Lewis and Clark, as well as the changes that came after this early-day exploring party with the coming of the missionaries, the Oregon Trail pioneers, and the homesteaders, fishermen, oystermen, and resort builders.  Also studied will be the anthropologists who came and studied the Native Americans who inhabited this culturally rich region of the Pacific Coast.  Participants will venture to Fort Columbia, Fort Canby, Dead Man's Cove, Leadbetter Point Wildlife Refuge, wetlands, bayside mud habitats, pioneer cemeteries, and towns and settlements like Oysterville, Ocean Park, Ilwaco, Nahcotta, and others.