Cascade Geographic Society's 
AUTUMN 2001 Tours

Important Notice: Participants must be prepared to begin on time and bring the following: sack lunch & snacks; $10 for museum fees, if needed; extra money in case of emergencies; proper dress and shoes to fit the weather conditions & season. Optional: camera & film. Please call (503) 622-4798 (Michael) or (503) 658-6233 (Nita) for information or registration.

YEARLY  TOURS 
(
all links from this category will take you away from this page, for more info see main tour page,)
Mount Hood's Infamous Oregon Trail -- Special Edition (Autumn and Spring)
Shanghai Tunnel Ghost Tour -- Special through Halloween 
Famous & Infamous Sites Of The Barlow Trail Carpool Tour (Aug 25)
Big Laurel Hill Carpool Tour
(Aug 26)

SEASONAL TOURS
(all links from this category will take you down this page)
Lewis & Clark-Native American Trail of Discovery
Aurora Colony, Champoeg, & French Prairie Heritage Sites
Historic Ethnic Communities of Old Town
Lower Willamette River Haunted Places & Folklore
Exploring Mt. Hood's Oregon Trail In Autumn
Folklore & Ghost Stories of Mt. Hood's Oregon Trail landscapes
Portland Architectural Landmarks & Mansions

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Lewis & Clark-Native American Trail of Discovery
Sauvie Island to Deer Island
Saturday Oct. 13, 10-5:30 p.m. --- Meet on Sauvie Island off Highway 30 in the parking lot just below the Bridge. Tour Guide: Michael P. Jones, M.S. Fee: $25 CGS Members/$35 Non-Members

The Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery explored the Columbia River during the years 1804 and 1805, following trails and canoe routes that had long been established by Native American populations of many thousands of years. Today, of critical interest to historians is the area along this "Great River of the West" which includes Wapato Island (known today as Sauvie Island) and Deer Island (named for its abundance of Deer). Both of these islands, as well as the area between them, represent rich multicultural landscapes that had been utilized by indigenous people for over 10,000-plus years.

This heritage of both the native people and Lewis and Clark will be explored as you follow in their footsteps and study these diverse histories through a number of special site visits, while you glean information. Also studied will be the relationship between natural areas -- such as Camas fields, Wapato beds, wetlands, lakes, beaver dams, etc. -- and cultural and historical sites.

Aurora Colony, Champoeg, & French Prairie Heritage Sites
Sunday Oct. 14th, 10-5:30 p.m. --- Meet outside the Carnegie Art Center at 606 John Adams, in Oregon City, Oregon. Tour Guide: Michael P. Jones, M.S. Fee: $30 CGS Members/$40 Non-Members

The settlements of the Aurora Colony, Champoeg, and French Prairie held the "key" to Euro-American control of the fertile Willamette Valley, not to mention the entire Northwest. This tour explores the history of the cultural uses of the Willamette River landscapes by Native Americans, the role of the French-Canadian trappers and their Indian wives, and later by Oregon Trail emigrants and other American homesteaders. Studied will be the Aurora Colony (a German religious commune), Champoeg (where Oregon's First Provisional Government was first founded during what became known as the "Wolf Meetings"), and the French Prairie Area, examining their fascinating past by visiting these special places of Old Oregon, which holds some ideal heritage educational sources for the study and exploration of the rich history of the Old Oregon Country.  

This tour will explore the well-known and little-known history of these unique frontier villages that played a significant role in the development of pioneer agriculture and cottage industries that became the economic foundation in what was then known as the "New Eden". Studied will be the unique way of life, traditions, religious beliefs, cultural practices, architecture, and folklore surrounding these special places of history by visiting and exploring them first hand.

Historic Ethnic Communities of Old Town
Friday Oct. 12th, 10-5:30 p.m. --- Meet outside in the parking lot near the former cinema at Mall 205, S.E. 102nd & Washington Street, Portland, Oregon. [NOTE: This mall is undergoing construction, so go to the building closest to Washington Street.]
Tour Guide: Michael P. Jones, M.S. Fee: $35 CGS Members/$50 Non-Members 

Historically, from 1850 to 1941, Portland's Old Town and adjacent waterfront areas earned a reputation for being the "Worst Port in the World" for its shanghai trade. An estimated 1,500 unsuspecting victims each year, who were primarily sailors, loggers, rivermen, cowboys, ranch hands, sheepherders, and drifters, found themselves being dropped through trapdoors, locked up in underground cells, and then taken through tunnels that "snaked" their way beneath the cast-iron and brick buildings that graced the cobblestone streets with their Victorian charm. Long known as the "Old North End", or "White Chapel" because of the ever-present violence, this was a part of the "City of Roses" that most citizens were warned to stay out of. However, the area had another side to it of which most people were either unaware or paid little attention to; ethnic communities. Here, sandwiched in between those visible places of vice -- bootlegging joints, speak-easys, bordellos, gambling parlors, opium dens, and nickel beer saloons -- was Japantown, Chinatown, and Gypsytown.

This tour examines and explores not only the shanghai history of Old Town, but also the other shocking histories that have been largely ignored: the Japanese from the 1880's up to their internment during World War II; the Chinese with their development of Old Chinatown to the violence that forced the establishment of New Chinatown; and the Gypsies who, after working the shipyards during the war, found themselves aggressively-targeted by new city ordinances that discriminated against them. This tour will will take participants from the past to contemporary times with the establishment of the "Classical Chinese Garden". It will assist participants in gathering new classroom resources to help with expanding inter-disciplinary units and curriculums for the study of Portland's little-known early maritime and ethnic history.

Lower Willamette River Haunted Places & Folklore
Saturday Oct. 20th, 10-5:30 p.m. --- Meet outside the Carnegie Art Center-- 606 John Adams, Oregon City, Oregon Instructor: Michael P. Jones, M.S. Fee: $30 CGS Members/$40 Non-Members 

The Lower Willamette River possess a rich heritage of oral tradition that is some of the richest in the Pacific Northwest. The folklore of this region reveals tales about reported ghostly hauntings that are associated with some historic events and places. From steamboat landings to pioneer graveyards, to historic homes, to a waterfall and camas-gathering area, and other significant sites will be visited while participants learn about some of the history and the people who are said to still haunt this places. 

This tour features a very different side of history -- the one rarely written about in books -- but passed on through the oral traditions of the Indians, fur traders, and early-day settlers and missionaries, and their descendants. This is an ideal way to learn about the history of what the emigrants called the "New Eden" (the Willamette Valley).

Exploring Mt. Hood's Oregon Trail In Autumn
Sunday Oct. 21st, 10-5:30 p.m. --- Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center 24525 E. Welches Road, Welches, Oregon. Tour Guide: Michael P. Jones, M.S. Fee: $25 CGS Members/$35 Non-Members

The first attempted crossing of Oregon Trail emigrants over Mt. Hood's rugged natural landscape with "Prairie schooners", took place in the Autumn of 1845. Following leader Samuel Kimbrough Barlow, they traversed over an ancient Native American path, making these Willamette Valley-bound travelers the first to take this great risk of crossing over the Cascade Mountain Range. This ordeal represented one of the more infamous ordeals in all of the history of the Oregon Trail and almost cost the emigrants their lives. For some reason, however, historians have either changed the details of this account, or ignored it completely.

This tour will not only take participants to those places visited by the "overlanders" during their ordeal during the same season that they passed through the mountains, but will also provide interpretations of the true account of Barlow and his party. Visited will be Devil's Half Acre, Barlow Pass, Toll Gate, forgotten and near-forgotten graves, Trillium Lake, Pioneer Woman's Grave, Big Laurel Hill where covered wagons were lowered down steep cliffs with ropes, the graves and other historic sites of Summit Prairie, and much more. This tour provides a chance to walk in the "footprints" of the Oregon Trail pioneers.

Folklore & Ghost Stories of Mt. Hood's Oregon Trail landscapes
Saturday Oct. 27th, 10-5:30 p.m. --- Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center 24525 E. Welches Road, Welches, Oregon. Tour Guide: Michael P. Jones, M.S. Fee: $25 CGS Members/$35 Non-Members 

The Oregon Trail crossed Mt. Hood's southern flank and served as an alternative for emigrants to rafting down the Columbia River, who mistakenly believed that it was safer. This ancient Indian path that traversed through rugged and dangerous natural areas that lead these travelers over the Cascade Mountains and eventually to the Willamette Valley, forced these "overland" travelers through seemingly bottomless swamps and into lowering their "Prairie Schooners" down steep cliffs with ropes. The events that took place along this crude path became part of this Mountain's history and folklore, with fascinating tales of indigenous people, the Mountain Men, the gold-seekers and other prospectors, homesteaders, as well as infamous highwaymen, cattle rustlers, horse thieves, and other outlaws, some of whose spirits reportedly still continue to haunt to this very day.

This tour will allow you to explore the places where this 11,235-foot Mountain's oral traditions have long told of ghosts who reportedly still continue to linger in their earth-bound prison. From historical sites along the Oregon Trail to quiet out-of-the-way places within the forest, to isolated pioneer graves and mysterious tunnels hidden within the earth, to haunted houses and the back roads of old homesteads, these unique stories are now part of the area's folklore.

Portland Architectural Landmarks & Mansions: A History of Elegance & Folklore
Saturday Dec 1st, 10-5:30 p.m. --- Meet outside in the parking lot near the former cinema at Mall 205, S.E. 102nd & Washington Street, Portland, Oregon. [NOTE: This mall is undergoing construction, so go to the building closest to Washington Street.]
Tour Guide: Michael P. Jones, M.S. Fee: $35 CGS Members/$50 Non-Members 

Portland's architectural landmarks are both diverse and elegant, with some experts actually referring to this wonderful eclectic assemblage as "frozen music". From the mansions of the "City of Roses" to the "painted ladies" of the Victorian homes, to the cast-iron frontage buildings and ornate fountains of the past, to even the magnificent bridges that continue to span the Willamette River, each of these landmarks possess a special grandeur that is unequaled in anything designed and built in our contemporary times. Each has their own story to tell, with some of this history having become part of the oral heritage of their neighborhoods, while others became immersed in the folklore of the city itself. 

Participants will explore a variety of these architectural wonders and learn about the fascinating stories behind them. Learn about the exciting history of some very unique places like Pittock Mansion, the Simon Benson House, the ornate fountains and cast-iron and brick-fronted buildings of Old Town, the elegance of such residences as the Palmer House, the Lion & the Rose House, the Tudor House, the Portland White House, the Clinkerbrick House, the MacMaster House, and others. View them first-hand inside and out, gather their histories, and learn about their fascinating histories and about the special communities of which they are part.