ISSUES ONLINE

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VOLUME 6, NO. 6: DECEMBER, 1999

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VOLUME 6, NO. 5: SEPTEMBER, 1999

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VOLUME 6, NO. 4:  AUGUST, 1999

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VOLUME 6, NO. 3:  JUNE, 1999

 

VOLUME 6/NUMBER 6: December, 1999

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Contribute to CGS for the 1999 Tax Year
There is still time to assist your 1999 taxes by donating to Cascade Geographic Society, whether it is a cash contribution, history or nature books, historical photographs, maps, journals, diaries, and other documents, artifacts, hand or power tools, etc. We are an all-volunteer organization that can use your help and you can benefit from a tax-deduction. So before you throw something out, give us a call at (503) 6 The Cascade Geographic Society is an educational organization. The group operates a "Sanctuary Lands Program" (that protects fish and wildlife habitats, cultural and historical resources), operates "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center" in the Village of Welches, restores fish and wildlife habitats, works with inner-city youth through our "Project Discovery" program, has preserved many miles along the Oregon Trail, protects cultural and historical sites, is working towards preserving Portland Underground (the Shanghai Tunnels), sponsors a number of festivals, special events, and a long list of tours throughout the year.
The work of the Cascade Geographic Society is saving todayís heritage resources for our and future generations. Wonít you assist with a contribution today?

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Christmas in underground Portland -- December [TBA 2000]
The history of Portlandís "Shanghai Tunnels" has been exposed to the Portland Metropolitan Area and beyond, thanks to four special reports by KGW Channel 8 and KOIN TV 6 News. By working with the Cascade Geographic Society, these well aired broadcasts helped to open up a whole new world to viewers who had not yet heard about the rumors of men being shanghaied and sold to sea captains for an average of $50 per man.

From 1850 to the beginning of World War II, shanghaiing, as it was known, ran rampart as greed and corruption controlled the politicians, the police, Avenue, and from whatís now Union Station south to Lair Hill Park (on the west side of the Ross Island Bridge) and beyond, unsuspecting sailors, loggers, cowboys, and other working stiffs, found themselves on board ship bound for the Orient.

If you and your family would like to see Portlandís shanghai tunnels for yourself, you can. The Cascade Geographic Society has scheduled their "Christmas In Underground Portland", a thank you tour for members, on [TBA 2000], December [TBA 2000]. Members need to be in good standing and need to reserve a place by calling Michael P. Jones at (503) 622-4798.

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SANCTUARY LANDS PROGRAM NEEDS YOUR HELP
Cascade Geographic Society has secured several acres that consist of a meadow, wetlands, and streams, in order to benefit fish and wildlife on Mount Hood by protecting it forever. The acreage also has a section of the Oregon Trail and Native American cultural sites. This acreage was threatened by both logging and development and would have destroyed Salmon habitat and critical seasonal range for wildlife, not to mention historical and cultural sites. This acreage is now part of our "Sanctuary Lands Program", which means that it will be protected forever. We are now in the process of raising money to help pay for this land; any amount contributed, no matter how small, will be gladly accepted. Individuals who contribute amounts of $100 or larger, will have their names placed on a plaque that will be located at the "sanctuary". This would be a good classroom project as well as a tax-deductible contribution, not to mention some "hands-on" restoration work. For more information, call: (503) 622-4798; or write us at: Sanctuary Lands Program, P.O. Box 398, Rhododendron, Oregon. 97049.

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HOW YOU AND YOUR FAMILY OR ORGANIZATION CAN KEEP WILDLIFE FROM BEING KILLED ON OUR ROADS
You and your family or organization can assist the Cascade Geographic Society from keeping wildlife from being killed on roads in the Mount Hood Area by sponsoring a "Wild Animal Warning Reflector". These unique devices are placed along roads in wildlife migration corridors and are beneficial to the animals dear, Cougar, Bobcat, Coyote, Raccoons, and other wild animals will wait until the vehicle(s) pass. The cost is only $20 a reflector. This is a great class project. Every reflector makes a difference. This is a great and critical fund-raising project! For additional information how you can help, please call (503) 622-4798. Or, write: Save Our Wildlife, P.O. Box 398, Rhododendron, Oregon. 97049.

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HISTORIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL TOURS
We customize our tours to meet your needs. From grade schoolers to elders, individuals to large groups, of all physical abilities, especially challenged learners, talented and gifted, we welcome all who are interested in learning more about cultural and natural history of our beautiful Mount Hood Region. From Oregon Trail excursions, trips down the Barlow Trail, the wonder of the Old-Growth Forests, to the special and sacred lands of Ancient Peoples, we offer over 35 tours you wonít want to miss. Send a SASE for a list of tours and prices. Group rates are available, with discounts for schools. Just one hour from downtown Portland, these tours are an ideal opportunity for a day trip you wonít forget. Enjoy the magic and splendor of the Mountain and its rich history. Be sure to reserve your space for our ever-popular tour of Mt. Hoodís Oregon Trail, featuring pioneer graves and campsites, historic trail ruts and little-known routes, stream crossings, and the infamous Big Laurel Hill, where pioneers were forced to lower their wagons down the steep cliffs with ropes.

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ENVIRONMENTAL & OREGON TRAIL PROJECTS
Last year, over 350 volunteers from Portland Metropolitan Area schools, organizations, and families assisted in restoring the natural environment and sections of the Oregon Trail but much work is left. If you want to contribute some volunteer time to benefit fish and wildlife, we could surely utilize you. Many things have contributed to the poor conditions of our Northwest, and we still have fish and wildlife habitats in need of enhancement or restoration. Help Salmon and wildlife species by lending Cascade Geographic Society a hand. Project sites range from the Columbia and Willamette Rivers to Mt. Hood. Give Nita Kreuzer, Volunteer Coordinator, a call at (503) 658-6233 [evenings].

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155th ANNIVERSARY OF THE BARLOW TRAIL - THE OREGON TRAILíS MOST INFAMOUS ROUTE OVER OREGONíS MOUNT HOOD
The Spring of 2000 marks the 154th Anniversary of the first attempted wagon crossing/road over Mt. Hood. Known as the Barlow Trail, this was the final overland link of the Oregon Trail that allowed "overland" travelers a cheaper but far more dangerous alternative to rafting their covered wagons down the Columbia River. In 1845, the wagon parties of Samuel Kimbrough Barlow, Joel Palmer, and William Rector joined together and attempted to make the first crossing of the 11,235-foot Mount Hood by widening an Ancient Indian trail. From mid-September through December, they battled their way through the thick timber of the Mountainís southern flank, and failed. They had to cache their "Prairie Schooners" and most of their possessions in a crudely-made log cabin, and hiked out. They didnít reach Oregon City until Christmas Day. The following year Barlow received a charter from the Provisional Government of Oregon and started a toll road which required, amongst other things, lowering their wagons down the steep cliffs of Big Laurel Hill with ropes. Today, with the expertise of an interpreter with the Cascade Geographic Society, experience this unique and colorful history by visiting emigrant campsites, graves, tollgates, wagon ruts and swales, and even the infamous Big Laurel Hill, the worst section of the 2,000-plus mile Oregon Trail. Or, study Old-Growth Forests, wetlands, Wild Rivers, Salmon and wildlife habitats, ethnobotany, environmental issues, and more, all located alongside this spectacular historic trail. Just give us a call at (503) 622-4798 for further information and details. Weíll work with you to develop just the right experience for you, your family, or organization.

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VOLUME 6/NUMBER 5: September, 1999

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Fish Habitat Project a Success at "Rhododendron Meadow"
The fish habitat project at "Rhododendron Meadow" was successfully completed during the month of August. This Autumn and Winter, with the return of dwindling stocks of Salmon and Steelhead to Henry Creek, they will find a much better habitat.

Cascade Geographic Society, working in cooperation with Jeremy Sikes, a Habitat Biologist with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Eric Mauck, a heavy equipment operator from Boring, Oregon, placed 25 logs into Henry Creek to create spawning and rearing areas, upstream of a pre-existing bridge. The work was accomplished under a special permit from the Division of State Lands. The planning for the stream work took many months and involved fish biologists from state and federal agencies, as well as from the private sector.

The "key" to accomplishing the project with minimal impact to the stream environment and the wetlands of "Rhododendron Meadow," was an expensive piece of heavy equipment called a "Spider Trackhoe." Resembling something from outer space with its four spider-like arms, this unique computerizes equipment can go where most cannot without destroying the environment.

Funding for the Henry Creek fish habitat project came from the following partnerships: Oregon Wildlife Heritage Foundation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland General Electric, All Terrain Excavating, and the Portland Water Bureau, in addition to private citizens. Habitat projects like these are critical to help save the endangered Salmon and Steelhead in the Sandy River Basin.

An environmental science class from Barlow High School will begin monitoring the recently completed fish habitat project in Henry Creek, beginning in October. They will return sometime in the Spring to evaluate the changes associated with the placement of logs in the stream and to assess any improvements in the spawning and rearing areas utilized by Salmon and Steelhead.

Plans are already underway to do even more habitat enhancement work next year. This would entail placing logs below the bridge in Henry Creek. Like this Summerís work, the goal of the project will be to enhance the stream habitat for anadromous fish.

Another project would be to enhance an important back-channel of Henry Creek. Considered ideal for spawning and for fish to escape the high-waters of Winter and Spring, such work will make "Rhododendron Meadow" and its related streams even more important for its habitat.
Two culverts on Little Brook Lane, which access "Rhododendron Meadow," and another upstream, are also being looked at for replacement by bridges or small arched culverts. In addition, a tributary of Henry Creek that was literally buried prior to the Cascade Geographic Society taking over the 14.5 acres, will be reopened and restored.

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TWO POTENTIALLY  RARE PLANTS DISCOVERED by botanist at "Rhododendron Meadow"

A botanist, recently retired after 25 years from the Bureau of Land Management, has discovered two potentially rare plants in "Rhododendron Meadow." Beginning next Spring, study and monitoring of the plants will be conducted so that they can be preserved.
Retired botanist, Larry Scoffield, who has been volunteering his time with Cascade Geographic Society at "Rhododendron Meadow," has been making some unique finds. His work has included identifying sensitive wetland plants and identifying plants used by Native Americans for food and medicines, in addition to identifying ceremonial plants.

One of the plants Larry discovered was not even supposed to grow in the Mount Hood Area. And the other one, he has never seen before in his career. So, the areas associated with these two plants are being protected, and next Spring he will begin his study on these two species, as well as continuing on with evaluating the plant species all through Rhododendron Meadow.

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Interpretative Kiosk Planned for Rhododendron Meadow
The resources of Rhododendron Meadow are important, and range from historical and cultural to fish and wildlife and other natural resources. As part of the Cascade Geographic Societyís Sanctuary Lands Program, they are being preserved as heritage treasures for future generations.

Assisting in the preservation of these heritage resources are the efforts to restore and maintain the natural landscape at Rhododendron Meadow. The most recent activity was the stream enhancement work in Henry Creek that took place in August. And, more such projects are sure to follow.
Planning for an interpretative kiosk is currently underway for Rhododendron Meadow that will identify the heritage resources -- like rare plants and those utilized in the ethnobotony of Native Americans, sections of the Oregon Trail, wetlands and wildlife habitat, streams, anadromous fish like Salmon, Steelhead, and Sea-Run Trout, and other resources. In addition, the restoration work taking place will be included in the kiosk.

Partners for the interpretative kiosk for Rhododendron Meadow currently include the following: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Wildlife Heritage Foundation, Chief Johnny Jackson of the Cascade-Klickitat tribe, Carol Logan representing the Clackamas tribe, Michael P. Jones and Nita Kreuzer of Rhododendron. If you would like to make any contributions to the interpretative kiosk for Rhododendron Meadow, either as an individual, family, business, or organization, or want more information on the project, contact the Cascade Geographic Society at P.O. Box 398, Rhododendron, Oregon 97049; or call: (503) 622-4798. All donations are tax deductible and any donation of $250 or over will insure the donor their name will be on a placque that will be placed and maintained on the facility.

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How You and your Family or organization can keep wildlife from being killed on roads
You and your class or organization can assist the Cascade Geographic Society from keeping wildlife from being killed on roads in the Mount Hood Area by sponsoring a Wild Animal Warning Reflector. These unique devices are placed along roads in wildlife migration corridors and are beneficial to the animals during the high-kill periods, which is between dusk and dawn. When the light of the on-coming traffic passes this section of road that has the "relector" mounted on a 3-foot post, Deer, Elk, Bear, Cougar, Bobcat, Coyote, Raccoons, and other wild animals will wait until the vehicle(s) pass. The cost is only $20 a reflector. This is a great class project. Every reflector makes a difference. This is a great and critical fund-raising project! For additional information how you can help, please call (503) 622-4798. Or, write: Save Our Wildlife, P.O. Box 398, Rhododendron, OR. 97049.

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ENVIRONMENTAL & OREGON TRAIL PROJECTS IN NEED OF VOLUNTEERS
Last school year, over 350 volunteers from Portland Metropolitan Area schools assisted in restoring the natural environment and sections of the Oregon Trail but much work is left. If you want to contribute some volunteer time to benefit fish and wildlife, we could surely utilize you. Many things have contributed to the poor conditions of our Northwest, and we still have fish and wildlife habitats in need of enhancement or restoration. Help Salmon and wildlife species by lending Cascade Geographic Society a hand. Project sites range from the Columbia and Willamette Rivers to Mt. Hood. Give Nita Kreuzer, Volunteer Coordinator, a call at (503) 658-6233 [evenings].

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CASCADE GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY WEBSITE UP AND RUNNING
The website for the Cascade Geographic Society is up and running, thanks to the work of Brian Lehmann of Beaver Creek. The site includes information about the organization, its projects, tours, classes, festivals, events, and more. Still in the development phase, you can keep updated on the organizationís work. You can locate us on the Internet at: http://members.tripod.com/cgs-mthood

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Shanghai tunnel tour scheduled for October 25th
If you havenít visited Portlandís infamous shanghai tunnels the past three months, then you havenít really been there at all. Thanks to volunteers, there have been one heck of a lot of changes that has taken place in the Underground -- a Victorian-style lighting system, a major clean-up of contemporary garbage, the removal of unused overhead pipe, etc. The results have been tremendous. A members tour of Portlandís infamous Shanghai Tunnels will take place on Monday, Oct. 25th, during the evening hours. This is a "thank you" for the support that people have given us.
Participants must pre-register in order to find out about the location of the Underground Tour and must be a member of Friends of the Cascade Geographic Society in good standing. Call (503) 622-4798 for information and reservations.

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1999 Mount Hood Festivals & Events
Mount Hood Salmon & Mushroom Festival
(Saturday) Oct. 2nd & (Sunday) Oct. 3rd ~ Noon to 5 p.m. at Mt. Hood Village, 65000 E 5ast U.S. Highway 26, Welches, Oregon. Also, includes the “Oregon State Chile Championship” (on Oct. 2nd) and the “Mount Hood Barbecue Cook-Off” (on Oct. 3rd).

Pioneer Harvest Feast [Reservations required!]
(Sunday) Nov. 7th ~ 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Mt. Hood Village, 65000 East U.S. Highway 26, Welches, Oregon.

Mount Hood Public Lands Clean-Up
(Saturday) Nov. 13th ~ 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Mt. Hood Village, 65000 East U.S. Highway 26, Welches, Oregon.

Christmas Along The Barlow Trail
(Saturday) December 11th ~ “Oregon Trail Heritage Evening” ~ 6 to 9 p.m., and (Sunday) December 12th ~ “Oregon Trail Heritage Tour” ~ 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.at Mt. Hood Village, 65000 East U.S. Highway 26, Welches, Oregon.

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154th ANNIVERSARY OF Mount Hoodís Oregon TRAIL
The Autumn of 1999 marks the 154th Anniversary of the first toll road over the Cascade Mountain Range. Known as the Barlow Trail, this was the final overland link of the Oregon Trail that allowed emigrant travelers a cheaper but far more dangerous alternative to rafting their covered wagons down the Columbia River. In 1845, the wagon parties of Samuel Kimbrough Barlow, Joel Palmer, and William Rector joined together and attempted to make the first crossing of the 11,235-foot Mount Hood by widening an Ancient Indian trail. From mid-September through December, they battled their way through the thick timber of the Mountainís southern flank, and failed. They had to cache their "Prairie Schooners" and most of their possessions in a crudely-made log cabin, and hiked out. They didnít reach Oregon City until Christmas Day. The following year Barlow received a charter from the Provisional Government of Oregon and started a toll road which required, amongst other things, lowering their wagons down the steep cliffs of Big Laurel Hill with ropes.

In the pioneer spirit, the Cascade Geographic Society will continue to provide ways for the public to experience this unique and colorful history, either by working like it has through schools, or by providing tours for interested individuals or groups. We believe that by providing different opportunities to experience Mount Hoodís Oregon Trail -- by visiting emigrant campsites, graves, tollgates, wagon ruts and swales, and even the infamous Big Laurel Hill (the worst section of the 2,000-plus mile Oregon Trail). Or, by studying Old-Growth Forests, wetlands, Wild Rivers, Salmon and wildlife habitats, ethnobotany, environmental issues, and more, all which are located alongside this historic trail, the reasons for preserving this heritage resource will continue to be reinforced.

The Cascade Geographic Society also is appreciative to the Barlow family with their colorful and very important history. Their support over the years has meant a great deal to our work. They have been an inspiration to keep moving ahead, whether for the preservation of Rhododendron Meadow and its resources, preserving the history of the Oregon Trail, working towards the preservation of Native American sites, or restoring and enhancing fish and wildlife habitats.
With the passage of 154 years since Samuel Kimbrough Barlow attempted to cross the southern flank of Mount Hood with a party of wagons, it is time to count our blessings for the segments and sites related to the Oregon Trail that we have left, and see to it that they will be around for future generations.

 

VOLUME 6/NUMBER 4: August, 1999

"Rhododendron Meadow" Fish Projects Underway
Efforts to aide dwindling runs of Salmon and Steelhead have been underway this Summer at "Rhododendron Meadow" in Henry Creek, a major tributary of the Zig Zag River. This wetland and wildlife habitat is a 14.5 acre natural area that helps make up the Cascade Geographic Society's 18-acre "Sanctuary Lands Program".

For many months the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) has been working with the Society for this first phase of fish enhancement projects. With money secured from the ODFW, and armed with the mandatory permits, the "Rhododendron Meadow" fish enhancement work is probably the most important project of its kind in the Sandy River Basin.

At "Rhododendron Meadow," nine areas of structures (i.e., logs and root wads), which are critical for anadromous fish habitat, are being placed in Henry Creek. In addition, work in a side-channel is also being done, which will provide a Winter refuge for juvenile and adult Salmon and Steelhead escaping floodwaters. 

Due to the sensitivity of the wetlands and riparian areas in "Rhododendron Meadow," a contractor with special equipment has been hired to do the project. Known as a "Spider Trackhoe," this unique piece of equipment has arms resembling a spider's. This work vehicle is not only computerized, but can walk on the land and in the stream like a spider would, without damage to the natural landscape.

According to Michael P. Jones, the Curator and Cultural & Natural Resource Consultant of the Society, the sensitivity of "Rhododendron Meadow" made it necessary to use special heavy equipment on the project. The extra costs of the "Spider Trackhoe" are worth it due to the savings in restoration to the wetlands and stream channel and riparian zone. 

The stream projects at "Rhododendron Meadow" should be finished by the time of the Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days in August. This coming Autumn, Winter, and Spring will be spent monitoring the progress of the fish enhancement work and planning next year's projects.

Winners Announced For Seaside Condo Raffle
They are well-deserving, long-time members of the "Friends of Cascade Geographic Society," and they are the lucky winners of the Seaside Condo Raffle. Ralph and Elsie Wickham have won this four-day, three-night stay on the Oregon Coast. The Cascade Geographic Society would like to say thank you to all who participated. All money raised goes towards paying-off the mortgage on "Rhododendron Meadow". TOP

THIS MONTH: Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days

 

VOLUME 6/NUMBER 3: June, 1999

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WIN A 5-DAY SEASIDE CONDO and assist "RHODODENDRON MEADOW"  Thanks to teachers Mark and Trudy Reese of Vancouver, Washington, you can spend five special days and four nights at a beautiful condo at Seaside on the Oregon Coast. The cost per chance? Only $2 for a raffle ticket! And, all money raised will go towards retiring the debt at Rhododendron Meadow. This Seaside condo sleeps three and includes a microwave, coffee pot, refrigerator, and cable TV. The vacation residence is available Sunday through Thursday, from mid-September, 1999 through mid-May, 2000. This is a perfect deal if you want to get away from it all, relax, and explore the beautiful Oregon Coast with this great inexpensive vacation. Walk in the footsteps of Native Americans and follow in the wake of Lewis and Clark and the maritime fur traders. Raffle tickets may be purchased for only $2, with no limit to the chances. The drawing will be held on August 1st -- for which you do not have to be present to win. The winner will be notified by telephone and mail immediately afterwards and announced in the next Cascade Geographic Society Newsletter. All money raised through the "Seaside Condo Raffle" will go to retire the debt for the purchase of Rhododendron Meadow, which is part of the Cascade Geographic Society's Sanctuary Lands Program.

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WORK CONTINUES on PORTLAND'S INFAMOUS "UNDERGROUND" Progress continues beneath the streets of Portland in restoring the infamous "Shanghai Tunnels". In one area beneath the Old Town, rubble has been cleared away and artifacts organized. In addition, Cascade Geographic Society member Terry McAllister has installed special lighting to illuminate the "underground"; he has also constructed a replica of a "deadfall" trapdoor. The Cascade Geographic Society is planning a special member's tour sometime during the Summer. All members are eligible to venture "underground" even if they have attended previous tours. Stay informed through the next Newsletter. Contact Us

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HENRY CREEK CULVERT FIXED JUST IN TIME FOR WINDER STEELHEAD MIGRATION:  Henry Creek is a major fish-bearing stream in the Mount Hood Area that is critical for the threatened and endangered Salmon and Steelhead. The stream passes through the Cascade Geographic Society's Rhododendron Meadow, a sanctuary for fish and wildlife, as well as historical and cultural resources. However, many years ago, a culvert that replaced a bridge on East Henry Creek Loop blocked the majority of upstream passage for fish. The once natural stair-stepping streambed now had a waterfall that was impossible for most fish to jump into. And, those that did manage such a leap were usually washed back down through the slick-bottomed culvert due to the velocity of the water. For over thirty-five years, fish passage was impeded by the culvert with no one knowing just what to do. Finally, Michael P. Jones, the curator of Cascade Geographic Society, decided to do something about the problem. He and other volunteers installed several logs below the culvert and created a jump pool. This allows anadromous fish, such as Coho and Chinook Salmon, and Steelhead, to get upstream to critical spawning habitats. The Great Winter Flood of 1996, however, washed some of the jump-pool components away. Divers Ken Lyttle of Milwaukie, and Dick Zschoche of Portland, however, came to the rescue. They donned their wetsuits, dove into the cold water of Henry Creek, and spent several hours doing the necessary repairs to allow fish to once again negotiate the culvert. The Henry Creek Fish Passage Project survived the raging waters of the 1997 Winter Flood, but not the one in 1998. With upstream passage now impeded for the Winter Steelhead who were supposed to begin their upstream migration, once again, Ken and Dick arrived on the scene. The water was even colder, but neither one hesitated. They dove in and began a long and tiring ordeal to help the fish maneuver the difficult culvert in order to get upstream. Ken and Dick were assisted by other volunteers who secured the necessary emergency permits, supplies, etc. These included: Michael P. Jones, Herb Forbes, and Jim Jones, as well as two individuals with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife -- Al Martin, a habitat biologist, and Dick Caldwell, the Salmon Trout Enhancement biologist. The Cascade Geographic Society undertakes fish projects on an on-going basis. If you would like to volunteer your labor, or contribute tools and supplies, please give us a call at (503) 622-4798.

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HENRY CREEK CULVERT MAY TURN INTO A COVERED BRIDGE: The culvert on Henry Creek, located in the Village of Rhododendron, is officially an orphan. Installed on East Henry Creek Avenue after a wooden bridge was removed, it has been a major source of headaches to biologists and fish conservationists, not to mention to the Salmon and Steelhead whose migration passage it blocked and interfered with for some forty years. However, none of the agencies who supposedly installed it are claiming responsibility. Neither the Clackamas County Road Department, which plows Henry Creek Avenue during the Winter snows, nor the U.S. Forest Service, who administers adjacent land for the public, claim to have any knowledge for installing it or maintaining it. Due to the listing of several Salmon and Steelhead species, as governmental entities they are required to maintain passage for fish. However, nearly a decade ago the Cascade Geographic Society did respond to the fish passage problems associated with the culvert, and installed and maintained a project to facilitate fish passage. In addition, the organization has conducted enhancement for downstream migration at this same location.

Recently the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife identified culverts in the Sandy River Basin that were considered problems for anadromous fish. And, although the Henry Creek Culvert Fish Passage Project is currently functioning, the agency has given it a "priority" status. Future major flooding could cause problems and require additional repairs.

With no governmental entity claiming any ownership or maintenance responsibility for the Henry Creek culvert, there is a strong likelihood of funding being available to improve on fish passage at this site. Money could be used for conducting some additional engineering to help improve on the Cascade Geographic Society's Henry Creek Culvert Fish Passage Project, as well as for some in-stream modifications.

However, just before we went to press, the future of the Henry Creek culvert took an interesting twist. After careful study of Henry Creek, it was determined that the best things for fish and wildlife was to pull out the culvert and replace it with a bridge. Anything that we were to do to enhance the culvert would accommodate adult anadromous fish only, but not juveniles, which means that the stream would still be blocked to young endangered Steelhead and Salmon. In addition, the culvert would also continue blocking the migration of wildlife in and out of Rhododendron Meadow and to other habitat, which would not be the case with a bridge.

So the plan now is to have Clackamas County construct a bridge over Henry Creek, but not your run-of-the-mill bridge; a covered one! Cascade Geographic Society would work as a partner and, if need be, secure any extra funds through a federal Community Development grant. The return of a covered bridge would be historically correct for the Mount Hood Area, which lost all of its covered bridges many decades ago.

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HENRY CREEK CULVERT FIX ALLOWED MIGRATION OF STEELHEAD:  The Cascade Geographic Society's Henry Creek Culvert Fish Migration Project that was damaged in the Winter 1999 flood waters and blocked fish migration, was fortunately repaired just in time. In February, with endangered Winter Steelhead ready to head upstream to spawn, long-time Cascade Geographic Society member Ken Lyttle of Milwaukie, and Dick Zschoche of Portland, saved the day. Dressed in wetsuits and scuba gear, they entered the cold water of Henry Creek and repaired the "log weir" that Society members had built over a decade earlier to help fish negotiate an improperly placed culvert.

Fish surveys along Henry Creek, Little Henry Creek, and Meadow Creek showed that Winter Steelhead had indeed benefited from the repairs. Pairs of these anadromous fish spawned in these streams during the months of March and April. A good many of these laid their eggs in streams within the boundaries of Rhododendron Meadow, a sanctuary land owned by Cascade Geographic Society.

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VOLUNTEER WORK AIDS FISH & WILDLIFE & THEIR HABITATS, & THE OREGON TRAIL: Work by volunteers aided fish and wildlife and their habitats on Mount Hood and Burlington Bottom in 1998. An estimated 1000 volunteer hours removed Scotchbroom and Himalayan blackberries, enhanced and restored fish and wildlife habitats, not to mention removing illegal trash dumps. For the year 1999, the Cascade Geographic Society is hoping to match or surpass this number of volunteer hours. Like the year 1998, needed would be adults and students of most any age.

The "targeted" work sites on Mount Hood include areas along the Salmon and Sandy Rivers, and Henry and Little Henry Creeks. Several major areas that will be tackled will be an Oregon Trail segment in the Village of Welches, and three segments in the Village of Wildwood. In Rhododendron, Scotchbroom along the Zig Zag River in "Pioneer Meadow", the former Zig Zag Campground, and at "Indian Camp Natural Area".
Elsewhere, the Cascade Geographic Society will also lend a hand. Work sites include Deep Creek Canyon near the Clackamas River, and Burlington Bottom near Sauvie Island.

Volunteers are the "lifeblood" of this organization. Whether it's opening up sections of the Oregon Trail, restoring fish and wildlife habitats, cleaning up Portland's Shanghai Tunnels, assisting in the building of living history exhibits at the "Oregon Country Settlement", working at "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center, or assisting at Cascade Geographic Society's Festivals, the work is important.
If you, your family and friends, co-workers, or organization, would like to assist in restoration efforts, please give the Cascade Geographic Society a call. Fish and wildlife will indeed benefit, not to mention our historic sites. Contact Us

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SCHOOL GROUPS' EFFORTS ASSIST BARLOW TRAIL AND FISH AND WILDLIFE HABITATS: The unselfish work of school groups have assisted greatly in the preservation of the Barlow Trail and fish and wildlife habitats on Mount Hood this past year. Thanks to Sabin School of Portland, Hollydale School and Lynch Meadows of Gresham, Scotchbroom and blackberries have vanished from the natural landscape. This enables not only the native vegetation to return, but also reveals sections and sites related to the Oregon Trail on Mount Hood.

The results of the school's efforts became very clear within a relatively short time. Along the Zig Zag River where Scotchbroom came in about 15 years ago, Nita Kreuzer's fifth grade class from Sabin School not only removed a good portion of this invader from the north bank, but they also cleaned up a major trash dump downstream, as well as took on blackberries and Scotchbroom that had begun to cover the slopes of Owl Mountain on the Salmon River. Hollydale School and Lynch Meadows made progress on the "jungle" of Scotchbroom on the Sandy River at the mouth of the Salmon River where Oregon Trail travelers were forced to "ford" an often times flood-swollen stream.

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CGS MEMBERS CAN TOUR SHANGHAI TUNNELS MORE THAN ONE TIME: If you are a member in "good standing" with the Cascade Geographic Society, you may tour Portland's Shanghai Tunnels as many times as you like, as long as there are scheduled tours and there is room. If you toured them in past years, you wouldn't recognize them due to the efforts of volunteers. Contact Us.