VOLUME 7/NUMBER 1 NEWSLETTER APRIL, 2000

In This Issue:
THE MILLENNIUM MEANS OUR HERITAGE RESOURCES ARE EVEN MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVER
"EARTH DAY" WORK PARTY NEEDS VOLUNTEER SUPERVISORS
Upcoming Tours

 


THE MILLENNIUM MEANS OUR HERITAGE RESOURCES
ARE EVEN MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVER
The Millennium --- the ending of one century and the beginning of the next --- means that our heritage resources are not only special and need to be preserved, but they are even more important than ever. These historical
and natural sites need to be passed on to future generations so that they, too, can learn from them, nurture and appreciate them, and then pass them on to others.

To some people, the coming of the next Century means that change is acceptable. The question is what kind of change? If change means losing our forests, wetlands, and other natural areas, the pollution of our rivers and creeks, the elimination of fish and wildlife species, the loss of more sections of the Oregon Trail, the destruction of Native American cultural and religious sites, historical landmarks, etc., then that should be unacceptable. We can have change and this can be positive without destroying what is important.

Change while maintaining our resources? It may sound impossible, but it has happened and it will occur again in the future. You can bet on it. A good example is the future widening of U.S. Highway 26 between the Villages of Zig Zag and Rhododendron on Mount Hood. Here, critical resources are at stake and will be lost forever if we do not truly appreciate what we have and do the proper things.

Interestingly, the Oregon Department of Transportation has been working very close to us to insure that improvements to U.S. Highway 26 can take place without destroying "at risk" public treasures. These heritage
resources include a National Register segment of the Oregon Trail, the Bear Creek Bridge (also known as the Faubion Bridge), Native American sites, wetlands, Salmon and Steelhead spawning and rearing areas, and much more.

Working together, an interesting team of resource people have come together to insure protection of cultural, historical, and natural resources while allowing improvements to Highway 26. Consisting of the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), Chief Johnny Jackson, the Kalapooia Sacred Circle Alliance, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Cascade Geographic Society, and others, we believe that this goal will be accomplished.

Preserving what we have while allowing change is tough. However, it definitely can work if everyone involved is truly honest and serious about protecting our heritage resources and building in the necessary protections.

Looking back at what we as the Cascade Geographic Society have helped to save in the 20th Century, has been a blessing. However, what we can help to save in the 21st Century will be even more critical. We can accomplish
this by staying unified and working together.

"EARTH DAY" WORK PARTY NEEDS VOLUNTEER SUPERVISORS
Volunteer supervisors are needed for the Cascade Geographic Society's "Earth Day" work party. Hollydale School of Gresham is returning for the third year in a row to assist in restoring fish and wildlife habitat. As
in previous years, students, teachers, and parent volunteers will be removing scotch broom.

The site selected for the "Earth Day" work party is the mouth of the Salmon River where it merges with the Sandy River and features some outstanding beaver dams. Known as the "Sandy River Crossing", this was a major "ford"
along Mount Hood's Oregon Trail where emigrants maneuvered the risky current with their covered wagons.

If you are interested in helping the "Earth Day" work party, please call us at (503) 622-4798. Or, if you would like to help on other volunteer projects, also give us a call.

UPCOMING TOURS (links will take you to tour page, there is no direct link back)
(Dates in violet  are still to come, blue have passed us by, but check back with our next news letter for more.)

Please note regarding payment for tours: Participants should register in advance so that any updated information or changes can be passed on. Always dress for the weather. Because there is no time to go out to eat, all participants must bring a sack lunch, something to drink, and snacks if needed. Cameras are optional, but you should bring extra film. You also need to bring at least $10 in cash to take care of any museum fees or for emergencies. For additional information, please call the tour leader, Michael P. Jones, at (503) 622-4798.

Lewis & Clark-Native American Trail of Discovery
Lower Sandy River Heritage Sites
  -- $15 Members/$25 Non-Members
April 9, 2000 TIME: 10-5:30 p.m. MEET: Columbia Gorge Factory Outlet Stores (in front of Mikasa), Troutdale, OR

Lewis & Clark-Native American Trail of Discovery: 
Sauvie Island to Deer Island
-- $15 Members/$25 Non-Members
April 16, 2000 TIME: 10-5:30 p.m. MEET: Parking Lot below the Sauvie Island Bridge, Sauvie Island, Oregon.

Pendleton Underground & Little-Known Frontier heritage sites
$35 Members/$45 Non-Members [NOTE: Includes tour fee.]
April 29, 2000 TIME: 10-5:30 p.m. MEET: PENDLETON, OREGON YOU MUST PERSONALLY CONTACT TOUR LEADER FOR INFORMATION!

Umatilla Indian Culture & Heritage sites
$35 Members/$45 Non-Members [NOTE: Includes Museum fee.]
April 30, 2000 TIME: 10-5:30 p.m. MEET: Pendleton, Oregon! YOU MUST PERSONALLY CONTACT TOUR LEADER FOR INFORMATION!

Lewis & Clark--Native American Trail of Discovery: Willapa Bay & Long Beach Heritage Sites
$25 Members/$35 Non-Members
May 6, 2000 TIME: 10-5:30 p.m. MEET: TO BE ARRANGED! YOU MUST PERSONALLY CONTACT TOUR LEADER FOR INFORMATION!

"Lady Washington" Maritime Heritage Voyage
$75 Members/$100 Non-Members [NOTE: Includes Ship fee.]
May 7, 2000 TIME: 10-5:30 p.m. MEET: Grays Harbor, Washington! YOU MUST PERSONALLY CONTACT TOUR LEADER FOR SPECIFIC INFORMATION!

Myths & Realities of the Oregon trail and other westward trails: a multi-media guide for educators
$25 Members/$35 Non-Members
May 14, 2000 TIME: 10-5:30 p.m. MEET: Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center, 24525 E. Welches Road, Oregon.

2000 By Cascade Geographic Society