Cascade Geographic Society
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Cascade Geographic Society
15th Annual Mt. Hood Huckelberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days
August 26, 27, 28
Information Posted Soon!

For Information Call (503) 622-4798
or Write: P.O. Box 398, Rhododendron, Oregon 97049.

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1999 SCHEDULE
15th Annual Mt. Hood Huckelberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days


FRIDAY, AUGUST 27th:

- HUCKLEBERRY PANCAKE FEED: 8 a.m. to Noon
A Hoodland Senior Center fundraiser.

- ARTS AND CRAFTS: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

- FREE MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT: All Day, beginning 8 a.m.

- FRESH HUCKLEBERRIES & WILDBERRY GOODIES: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
JAMS, MILKSHAKES,SUNDAES, PIES, TARTS,
CANDY, SAUCES, & MORE

- HISTORICAL TRACTORS: 10 a.m. 5 p.m.

- VINTAGE CAR RIDES: Noon to 5 p.m.

- NATIVE AMERICAN SALMON BAKE: Noon to 6 p.m.

- FAMOUS & INFAMOUS SITES OF THE BARLOW TRAIL TOUR: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
This carpool tour explores sections of Mount Hoodís Barlow Trail, a Native American path that became the first toll road over the Cascade Mountain Range. Participants will visit pioneer graves, campsites, tollgates, and will view remnants of this historic Wilderness path, including ruts and swells of the long gone Prairie Schooners. Stories of the struggles of these Eden-seeking emigrants accent the unique setting of this historic trail and related sites. Autumn of 1999 marks the 154th Anniversary of the first attempted, but failed, crossing of the Barlow Trail by covered wagons, and the 153rd Anniversary of the opening of this terrible trail as a so-called toll road.


SATURDAY, AUGUST 28th:

- HUCKLEBERRY PANCAKE FEED: 8 am to Noon

- ARTS AND CRAFTS: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

- FREE MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT: Throughout the day beginning at 8 a.m.

- FRESH HUCKLEBERRIES & WILDBERRY GOODIES -- JAMS, MILKSHAKES, SUNDAES, PIES, TARTS, CANDY, SAUCES, & MORE: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

- HISTORICAL TRACTORS: 10 a.m. 5 p.m.

- VINTAGE CAR RIDES: Noon to 5 p.m.

- NATIVE AMERICAN SALMON BAKE: Noon to 6 p.m.

- MT. HOOD'S WORLD RECORD-BREAKING WATERMELON LAUNCH: Set-up at 2 p.m. and Blast-off at 3 p.m. See Watermelons fly as they are splattered into space by catapults and other devices representing some of the most unique and absolutely crazy fruit and produce launchers ever invented. THIS IS GREAT FUN FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY! AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION IS ALWAYS WELCOME!

- Free Workshop on Chili Cook-Off & Barbecue Competition: Hosted by Chef Extraordinaire Steve Price -- 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. [to learn more about and help prepare for the upcoming cooking competitions to be held at the Mount Hood Salmon & Mushroom Festival on October 2nd and 3rd].

- NATIVE AMERICAN STORYTELLING, DANCING, DRUMMING, & SINGING: Mid-Columbia River Dance Troupe with Michael P. Jones -- 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.

- HUCKLEBERRY CEREMONY: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. -- Lead by American Indians, this ceremony honors the Huckleberries and other natural resources of Mount Hood, including its rich indigenous history. Honor songs, speeches, and drumming highlights this event.

- BIG LAUREL HILL TOUR: 7 p.m. -- This carpool tour explores the most infamous site of the 2,000-plus mile Oregon Trail, where emigrants snubbed ropes to trees and covered wagons were lowered down ruggedly-steep cliffs just above Mount Hoodís Zig Zag Canyon. Storytelling adds a special touch to this excursion and brings the past to life.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 29th:

- HUCKLEBERRY PANCAKE FEED: 8 am to Noon

- ARTS AND CRAFTS: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

- FREE MUSICAL ENTERTAINM »ENT: Throughout the day, beginning at 8 a.m.

- FRESH HUCKLEBERRIES & WILDBERRY GOODIES -- JAMS, MILKSHAKES, SUNDAES, PIES, TARTS, CANDY, SAUCES, & MORE: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

- HISTORICAL TRACTORS: 10 a.m. 5 p.m.

- VINTAGE CAR RIDES: Noon to 5 p.m.

- BARLOW TRAIL HORSE AND WAGON PARADE: 11 a.m.

- BARLOW TRAIL HORSE & WAGON SHOW: Noon to 1 p.m.

- BARLOW TRAIL WAGON RIDES: Following the Horse & Wagon Show.

- NATIVE AMERICAN SALMON BAKE: Noon to 6 p.m.

- NATIVE AMERICAN STORYTELLING, DANCING, DRUMMING, & SINGING: Mid-Columbia River Dance Troupe & Michael P. Jones -- 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.


PLEASE NOTE: SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGES!
UPDATED INFO. AVAILABLE AT THE INFORMATION BOOTH!

Educational ~ Family-Oriented ~ Free Admission! ~ Free Parking!
~ A Festival of the Cascade Geographic Society, Inc. ~

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Fresh Huckleberries, Jams, and Other Goodies

The Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days sponsors will be selling a wide range of special goodies all made out of fresh Wild Huckleberries. This is one place in the Northwest that people can be assured that they can not only see what a Huckleberry looks like, but enjoy its uniquely-delicious untamed taste in a variety of foods.

This yearís Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days will feature Huckleberry pies, Huckleberry tarts, Huckleberry bonbons, Huckleberry lollipops, and other candy made out of Huckleberries. There will also be the Festivalís ever-famous Huckleberry milk shakes, Huckleberry sundaes, Huckleberry taffy, and Huckleberry cheesecake candy.

However, individuals wishing to purchase these treats should plan on coming early to the Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days. It seems that no matter how many are on hand, they usually sell out very fast. It takes just one bite and most people know why these delectable desserts are so popular.

There will also be an abundance of Huckleberry jam and Huckleberry sauce; great for just about anything you can use your imagination to put them on, they are also perfect for gifts. This is one thing that you can give for even that most difficult person to buy as a holiday or special occasion gift.

The Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days also will be selling other Wildberry jams. These include Olalliberry, Elderberry, and Lingonberry.

Other items made from Natureís delicious bounties are also being featured. These include Chokecherry and Wild Plum jam. In addition, there are delicious flavored mustards made from Raspberry and Ollaliberry, as well as garlic and dill, that are ideal for sandwiches, barbecues, meats, fish, and poultry.

Rumor has it that the elusive Wild Huckleberries are not abundant this year, due to the unique weather conditions this past growing season, but there should be plenty for sale for festival-goers at the Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days. Huckleberry pickers are finding large amounts in selected areas so there will be enough for those wanting to purchase quarts or gallons of their own wild bounty to make pies and jams, or just for eating
raw.

The 15th Annual Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days is scheduled for August 27th, 28th, and 29th, 1999. The location is Mt. Hood Village, 65000 E. U.S. Highway 26, near the Village of Brightwood on the way to Mount Hood. For additional information, contact the Cascade Geographic Society at (503) 622-4798.


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WILD HUCKLEBERRY PANCAKE FEED

The "Huckleberry Pancake Feed", a fundraiser for the Hoodland Senior Center, once again will be featured at the 15th Annual Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days, and is expected to draw a record number of hungry folks with a taste for the delicious, delectable Wild Huckleberry. Last year's Huckleberry fans came from all over the Pacific Northwest and beyond for this special feed which features pancakes l full of High Cascade Mountain Range Huckleberries, sausage, melon wedge, juice, and coffee.

Don't miss out on this tasty treat while helping to support the important activities and services provided by the Hoodland Senior Center to the most honorable members of our communities -- our elders. Volunteers will be hard at work cooking this year's delicious breakfast which will be served from 8 am to Noon August 27th (Friday), August 28th (Saturday), and August 29th Sunday.

Volunteers are wanted to help out. For further information, please contact Jeri McMahan at the Hoodland Senior Center (503) 622-3331.

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THE HISTORY:

The Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days began sometime in the late 1880's or early 1890ís, although most folks who are still alive from those days canít seem to agree on a specific date. However, it is highly probable that this Festival actually came into existence about the same time the Welches Hotel first opened, which was the Summer of 1890.

Samuel Welch, an Oregon Trail pioneer of the 1840's, is credited with planting the "seeds" of the tourism movement on Mt. Hood. While crossing the Blue Mountains, he first caught sight of Oregon's highest mountain, an 11,235 foot snow-clad Peak, and had a dream about establishing a resort on that beautiful Mountain. And, during those early times when Samuel rolled up his sleeves and began working towards that dream, the Mt. Hood Huckleberry Festival (as it was simply known back in those early days) came into existence.

Samuel was a Pennsylvania-born emigrant, who crossed the Oregon Trail with his brother in a Prairie Schooner ( which was a small, modified farm wagon that was literally an oblong box on wheels -- approximately four feet wide by ten to fifteen feet long, with the sideboards rising up about two feet high). After residing first in Oregon City and then Washougal, Washington, and, still later, the Orient area just east of Gresham, he moved up to Mt. Hood in 1880 with his sixteen year old son, Billy.

After Samuel had relocated to Mount Hood, he and his teenage son operated a trading post at the mouth of the Zig Zag River near where it joined the Sandy River. This small log and split-cedar structure, was a former Hudsonís Bay Company trading post or outpost that had been abandoned when the British settled the Oregon issue with the Americans and relocated their operations to what is now known as Canada.

During this period, Samuel began homesteading the lower Welches Valley where he first constructed a two-story farmhouse for his family, and then fashioned the land at the threshold of the rugged Salmon River Canyon into a ranch. Here, he brought in cattle which he pastured in what is now the golf course at The Resort At The Mountain. Occasionally, he would even bring in a herd of Wild Horses which he broke and would sell in Portland.

In 1889, Samuel began enlarging his family home, which he called the Big House, into a hotel. By July 1st when all threats of snows in the lower elevations of Mount Hood had finally subsided, this was the beginning of the Summer tourist season back then, and the Welches Hotel opened its doors to its first guests.

To celebrate the opening of the Welches Hotel, Samuel and his son Billy decided to organize a Festival. However, this was not just to call attention to their new hotel, but also to a special bounty that drew the people to Mount Hood: Huckleberries. So, the Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival was born.

A year or two later, the Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival was
relocated to the Old Village of Salmon. This quaint frontier settlement was located just west of what is now the Village of Brightwood on a segment of the Oregon Trail that later became part of the Mount Hood Loop Highway.

Samuel decided that it was the most ideal place for the Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival, since this location on the west bank of the Salmon River. He and other settlers believed that it was destined to become a boom town for Mount Hood due to its rapid growth from an Oregon Trail campsite to a village that was now boasting its own voting precinct, hotel, and saloon.

The Village of Salmon was a tiny, crude settlement that remarkably was fashioned out of an original campsite that had been utilized by those who were traversing over the Oregon Trail. These early-day travelers had been seeking an overland route into the Willamette Valley for the final leg of their 2,000-plus mile journey by traveling over Mount Hood's rugged southern flank on an ancient Native American path that became known as the Barlow Trail. This was an alternative to rafting the final miles down the Columbia River.

At this particular location on Mount Hood, situated just west of today's Village of Brightwood on the banks of the Salmon River near where it merges with the Sandy River, emigrants "forded" the Rivers and continued on to the "New Eden" (the Willamette Valley) which lay farther to the west. However, some of the "overlanders" took a liking to this place, and eventually returned to set down their roots.

Unfortunately, at this historic site where a cluster of frontier homes -- along with a saloon, hotel, post office and voting precinct -- eventually came to be constructed, did not survive the onslaught of the coming years. The future, as some old-timers have reminisced, did not have a place for this pioneer village that grew up along a segment of the Oregon Trail on Mount Hood.

Eventually , as the Village of Salmon began to fade into history, the focus of the Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival came to rest in Brightwood. There, the owners of the McIntyre Store, located where today's Brightwood Country Store is today, took the celebration under their wings and promoted it locally. A Huckleberry Queen was added and an official parade was instituted as part of the festivities, with a big Huckleberry Pancake Feed. With the main road from Portland running past the business, everyone who walked through their doors learned about the Festival and its up-coming events.

Tourists were drawn to the event although it was a long and difficult drive to Mount Hood. Yet, the Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival remained relatively small, in spite of the support and glowing endorsements from local Mountain residents and tourists from the city who took pride in not only that delicious wild bounty known as the Huckleberry, but also the area's scenic beauty and rich history.

Finally, in the 1930's, the Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival reign regrettably came to an end. During the economic turmoil of the Great Depression, the McIntyre family and other folks did not see too much to celebrate because of the "hard times" that plagued the Mountain and the rest of the Nation. Gradually, without fanfare, the Festival silently died.

In 1985, approximately fifty-five years after the difficult reign of the Great Depression claimed the Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival as one of its victims, a handful of Mount Hood residents pooled their energy and brought the celebration back into existence. They combined it with a new proposed event -- known as the "Barlow Trail Days" -- to bring attention to the wealth of history associated with that Old Oregon Trail, and the segments which still had survived and endured the passage of time.

Recognizing the need to educate the public, the sponsors of the revitalized Huckleberry Festival organized activities that would be fun and informative, with the goal of providing free opportunities for all to enjoy. This was the purpose of the Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days.

The Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days has grown into a family-oriented event which continues to expand and attract people from all over Oregon, the Pacific Northwest, and beyond. Each year the number of participants increases, and while the Festival is in its relative infancy, increasing interest and participation continues to build. The celebration's events are truly unique, educational, fun, and, for the most part, free to the public.

In 1999, the Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days is celebrating its fifteenth year. Now situated at Mt. Hood Village, 65000 East U.S. Highway 26 near the Village of Brightwood, it continues to celebrate Huckleberries, as well as other bounties of Nature, not to mention our rich Native American and Oregon Trail history.

This year the tradition of our history and our natural resources continues. The festivities mark the 15th annual event under the sponsorship of the Cascade Geographic Society, ever since it was resurrected back in 1984. The Festival is still undergoing changes and is transitioning into something for future generations, but, yet, still retaining the heritage of our past.

For further information about the , please write: Cascade Geographic Society, P.O. Box 398, Rhododendron, Oregon 97049. Or, call: (503) 622-4798.


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