Cascade Geographic Society's 
SUMMER 2003 Classes


(Graduate & Undergraduate cooperative Education Classes through Portland State University)

Payment Notice: Please note regarding payment for classes: make out one check (to P.S.U.) or pay with your credit card. You need to do this separately for each class. Check or credit card must be processed through Cascade Geographic Society, and must be received prior to the second class date . Payments not received by then may delay official registration and credit/grade. Please call (503) 622-4798 (Michael) or (503) 658-6233 (Nita) for information or registration.

Important Notice: Participants must be prepared to begin on time and bring the following: sack lunch & snacks; $10 for museum fees, if needed; extra money in case of emergencies; proper dress and shoes to fit the weather conditions & season. Optional: camera & film.

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Cascade Geographic Society's Summer 2003 PSU Class Schedule

(cooperative education classes through Portland State University)

    Please note regarding payment for classes:  you need to make out only one check, or pay with your credit card.  Check or credit card is to be made payable to Portland State University; this payment must be processed through Cascade Geographic Society, and must be received by the beginning of the class.  Payments not received by then will delay official registration and credit/grade.  Please call (503) 622-4798 or (503) 658-6233 for information or registration

 

Oregon Trail & Fur Trade Settlements of the Lower Willamette Valley --- 1 Credit

Graduate: CRN: CI 810 --- Undergraduate: CI 410

INSTRUCTOR:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee:  $130

DATES, TIMES, AND MEETING PLACES: Thursday, June 26 (9 a.m.-noon.) at Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 SE Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (just outside of Boring); and Friday, June 27 (9-4:30 p.m.) -- meet at Carnegie Art Center, 606 John Adams St., Oregon City, Oregon.

          The Oregon Trail and fur trade-era settlements in the lower Willamette Valley represent a rich heritage awaiting to be explored.  Aurora Colony, Oregon City, Canby, Canemah, Gladstone, Milwaukie, Sucker (today's Lake Oswego), Hubbard, Champoeg, Butteville, St. Paul, St. Louis, Gervais, Mission Landing, Newberg, Yamhill, Portland, and others are inter-related with the overland emigration, the early days of the fur trade, missionaries, and homesteading history.  Class participants will explore the history and related important sites of this "New Eden", by studying the relationship of settlement and statehood to Manifest Destiny, religious purposes, and economic incentives, as well as learning about multi-cultural interactions with indigenous people, including the impact of disease impacts on Native Americans, the cultural and religious sites that were destroyed by this early-day development, the treaties made and broken, the Indian wars, and more.  This class will learn about history by exploring these important heritage sites. 

 

exploring waterfalls, Old-Growth, Beaver Dams, & wild rivers FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION --- 1 Credit

Graduate: CRN: CI 810 -- Undergraduate: CI 410

INSTRUCTOR:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee:  $130

DATES, TIMES, AND MEETING PLACES:  Monday, July 7 (9 a.m. - noon) at Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 SE Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (just outside of Boring); and Tuesday, July 8 (9-4:30 p.m.) -- meet at Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center, 24525 East Welches Road, in the Village of Welches, Oregon.

          Ecosystems make the best living laboratories for the study of environmental education.  Such is the case for Mt. Hood's spectacular waterfalls, old-growth forests, beaver dams, and wild rivers such as the Sandy, Salmon, and Zig Zag Rivers, its wetlands, lakes, beaver dams, and meadows.  All of these special places on the natural landscape provide special enrichment opportunities that can be utlilzed in teaching.  This class will help you understand the natural functions of these ecosystems, how to incorporate this knowledge back into your classroom, and how to develop field studies opportunities for your students.  Participants will gain knowledge to develop teaching units on wildlife, fisheries, ethnobotony, and other environmental studies, as well as develop ideas on creating cross-curriculum activities. This class will provide you with the opportunity to visit a diversity of natural habitats and gather useful information that can be integrated into your classroom science units and environmental studies curriculum.

 

 

Exploring the Old Columbia River Highway:  Westside Heritage Sites --- 1 Credit

Graduate: CRN: CI 810 -- Undergraduate: CI 410

INSTRUCTOR:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee:  $130

DATES, TIMES, AND MEETING PLACES: Monday, July 7 (noon - 3 p.m.) at Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 SE Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (just outside of Boring);  and Wednesday, July 9 (9-4:30 p.m.) -- meet in the parking lot outside Mikasa at the Columbia Gorge Factory Outlet Stores, Troutdale, Oregon.

    The scenic marvels and history of the Columbia River will be unveiled through an educational excursion along the Old Columbia River Highway, exploring the wealth of heritage sites just waiting to be discovered. Constructed between the years of 1913 to 1915, this early-day engineering wonder is considered to be one of the most beautiful scenic roadways in all of the world.  From the mouth of the Sandy River eastward to Multnomah Falls, participants will venture forth, learning about the many special cultural, historical, and natural sites and features that depict the history of American Indians, the Euro-American explorers, the fur traders, the Oregon Trail pioneers, the homesteaders and miners, as well as the early-day tourist providers and recreationalists, and the history of this special road.  Visit waterfalls, scenic vistas, historic buildings and towns, natural areas, pioneer sites, and much more, as this historic highway unfolds before you while new ideas and information are shared with you that should enrich your classroom learning environment and enhance curriculums.

 

Exploring the Old Columbia River Highway:

eAstside Heritage Sites --- 1 Credit

Graduate: CRN: CI 810 -- Undergraduate: CI 410

INSTRUCTOR:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee:  $130

DATES, TIMES, AND MEETING PLACES:  Monday, July 7 (3 - 6 p.m.) at Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 SE Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (just outside of Boring); and Thursday, July 10 (9-4:30 p.m.) -- meet in the parking lot outside Mikasa at the Columbia Gorge Factory Outlet Stores, Troutdale, Oregon.

    The scenic Columbia River Highway has some of the most breath-taking sites anywhere in the world. Constructed between the years of 1913 to 1915, early-day road builders pushed this "modern" roadway through the rugged Gorge that plagued Oregon Trail pioneers and early-day homesteaders with its dramatic but treacherous terrain.  It was also the ancestral home for many indigenous people, whose heritage sites span this early road.  This class will allow participants to explore the many special cultural, historical, and natural sites and features that depict the culture and history of Native Americans, the Lewis and Clark Expedition and other Euro-American explorers, the fur traders, and much more.  Visit Multnomah Falls, Cascade Locks, Hood River, and steamboat landings, old military fort sites, and more. Participants will also cross over the Bridge of the Gods and travel Highway 14 to Skamania Lodge and Museum, Beacon Rock, and other sites of interest. Participants will gain new ideas and information to enrich your classroom learning environment and curriculums.

 

Mt. Hood's other oregon trail: infamous lolo pass --- 1 Credit

Graduate: CRN: CI 810 -- Undergraduate: CI 410

INSTRUCTOR:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee:  $130

DATES, TIMES, AND MEETING PLACES: Monday, July 14 (9 a.m. - noon) at Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 SE Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (just outside of Boring);and Tuesday, July 15 (9-4:30 p.m.) -- meet at Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center, 24525 East Welches Road, in the Village of Welches, Oregon.

    Mt. Hood stood as an obstacle to the Oregon Trail pioneers who wanted to bring their wagons through the Cascade Mountains as an alternative to rafting them down the Columbia River.  Until Samuel K. Barlow opened a toll road around the Mountain's southern flank in 1846, emigrants had to travel over an Ancient Indian path along the northern side of the 11,235-foot peak. Known as the ³Walk-Up Trail' and, later, the ³Daniel Lee Cattle Trail², this route was so rugged that no covered wagon was said ever to have made it over this path.  Instead, those early travelers either rode horseback or walked in order to reach the Willamette Valley by dry land.  This class will take participants to various historic sites and routes associated with this little-known trail, from the Village of Zig Zag to Lost Lake in Hood River Valley.  This special interpretative tour will take you to some of the most scenic country in Oregon, making it an ideal educational excursion where you learn about the Indians, their history and mythology, the fur traders and Mountain Men, Lewis and Clark, miners, homesteaders, and early-day Forest Rangers and loggers, all of whom played a role in this special passage through the Cascade Mountains.

 

 

 

Oregon TRAIL Heritage Sites:  MT. HOOD's westside --- 1 Credit

Graduate: CRN: CI 810 -- Undergraduate: CI 410

INSTRUCTOR:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee:  $130

DATES, TIMES, AND MEETING PLACES: Monday, July 14 (noon - 3p.m.) at Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 SE Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (just outside of Boring); and Wednesday, July 16 (9-4:30 p.m.) -- meet at Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center, 24525 East Welches Road, in the Village of Welches, Oregon.

    The Oregon Trail segments that traversed over Mt. Hood were the most difficult in all of the 2,000-plus miles of this difficult path that was utilized by the overland emigrants.  Known as the "Barlow Trail", danger seemed to lurk at each and every step, although its most infamous site was Big Laurel Hill where travellers were forced to lower ther wagons with ropes down steep cliffs.  However, other places along this route were just as dangerous and claimed an equal number of lives.  Yet, it was promoted to be a relatively reasonable, not to mention cheaper, alternative, to the Columbia River to get to the "New Eden" (the Willamette Valley).  Today, over 150 years later, you can still follow in the wake of these pioneers and stand in their "footprints" as you study the incredible history of this crude path first hand.  Learn about the rich multi-cultural history, which dates back to some ten thousand years of Native American use prior to the coming of the first whites.  Participants will visit near-forgotten grave sites, stream ³fords², places where the original wheel ruts and swales have left their mark upon the natural landscape, and many other special sites. This class that will enhance how you teach the Oregon Trail in your classroom, and will provide a wealth of information to re-energize your curriculum. 

 

Oregon TRAIL heritage sites:  MT. HOOD's eAstside --- 1 Credit

Graduate: CRN: CI 810 -- Undergraduate: CI 410

INSTRUCTOR:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee:  $130

DATES, TIMES, AND MEETING PLACES: Monday, July 14 (3-6 p.m.) at Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 SE Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (just outside of Boring); and Thursday, July 17 (9-4:30 p.m.) -- meet at Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center, 24525 East Welches Road, in the Village of Welches, Oregon.

    The infamous Oregon Trail segment over Mt. Hood -- known as the "Barlow Trail" -- that maneuvers up and over the mountain's rugged eastern landscape, follows a dangerous scenic route through Dufur, Tygh Valley, Wamic, Smock Prairie, White River, Devil's Half Acre, and Barlow Pass. Utilized by Native Americans for its first ten thousand years, over 150 years ago it became the first toll road over the Cascade Mountain Range. This class will guide its participants on a special interpretative excursion over this infamous wilderness path, guiding them to a former tollgate, campsites, little-known routes, cabin sites, solitary graves and cemeteries, in addition to an old frontier hotel, pioneer schoolhouse, an octagon barn, and much more.  This is an opportunity to travel to some little-known sections of the Oregon Trail from the comfort of your car, while learning about the terrible ordeal that thousands of emigrants had to endure in order to reach the Willamette Valley.  This is an ideal way to learn about history firsthand, while acquiring many new ideas for your classroom.

 

Sacred Sites, Mythology, & Cultural History Of Mt. Hood's Natural Landscape

--- 1 Credit

Graduate: CRN: CI 810 -- Undergraduate: CI 410

INSTRUCTOR:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee:  $130

DATES, TIMES, AND MEETING PLACES:  Monday, July 21 (9 a.m. - noon) at Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 SE Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (just outside of Boring); and Tuesday, July 22 (9-4:30 p.m.) -- meet at Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center, 24525 East Welches Road, in the Village of Welches, Oregon.

    Mt. Hood's natural landscapes represent a cultural identity of Native American cultural and religious sites, including their history and mythology and legends.  This class explores the rich heritage that dates back some 10,000-plus years, highlighting the role that the natural physical environment played in their day-to-day way of life and survival. Participants will visit a number of sites, travel segments of indigenous trails, and learn about oral tradition and some religious practices, as well as gain a better understanding of Northwest Indian culture.  There will be a strong emphasis on the legal protection of archaeological and cultural sites; the politics of protecting sacred sites; methods to evaluate natural sites for their cultural heritage, such as wetlands, riparian areas, rock outcroppings, meadows, etc.  Learn how to integrate this information back into the classroom learning environment.

 

Living History & Frontier Living Experience for Educators --- 1 Credit

Graduate: CRN: CI 810 -- Undergraduate: CI 410

INSTRUCTOR:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee:  $140

DATES, TIMES, AND MEETING PLACES:  Monday, July 21 (Noon-3 p.m.) at Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 SE Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (just outside of Boring); & Wednesday, July 23 (9-4:30 p.m.) -- meet at Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center, 24525 East Welches Road, in the Village of Welches, Oregon.

    Experience some of the chores and tasks that faced the pioneers and early-day homesteaders in the Old Oregon Country through this unique "hands-on" experience of the past in a unique 1840's setting.  Participants will come to understand the challenges of the Wilderness that taxed the endurance and emotional stability, as well as the physical strength of the Oregon Trail emigrants and settlers.  During those times, survival was based not only upon the intelligence that they employed in doing their daily tasks and chores, but how they lived, cooperated, and worked with others. This class allows the participants to experience some elements of the workday on the frontier, such as dutchoven cooking, fashioning metal in a blacksmith shop, candle- and soap-making, making fire without the use of matches, splitting shakes, cutting wood with a bowsaw and crosscut saw, fashioning furniture with a foot-powered lathe, and other old-fangled skills.  Learn about constructing temporary shelters and architecture, pioneer clothing, and quilting, as well as about folklore and folkways, village life, and much more.  Use historical artifacts and taste pioneer foods and step back into time.  Educators can take this experience back into their classroom and incorporate what they've learned into curriculums and ³hands-on² units.

 

Columbia River Gorge Petroglyphs &

Native American Heritage Sites & History --- 1 Credit

Graduate: CRN:  CI 810 -- Undergraduate: CI 410

INSTRUCTOR:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee:  $140

DATES, TIMES, AND MEETING PLACES:  Monday, July 21 (3-6 p.m.) at Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 SE Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (just outside of Boring); &  Friday, July 25 (8-3:30 p.m.) -- meet in the parking lot outside Mikasa at the Columbia Gorge Factory Outlet Stores, Troutdale, Oregon. ***Please note early meeting time on July 25***

    The Columbia River Gorge is world reknowned for its scenery and geologic wonders, drawing millions of tourists and recreationalists each year.  Yet, this spectacular natural landscape has over 10,000 years of Native American history that has been interwoven into this area with special heritage sites representing a unique history worthy of exploration.  Participants will visit petroglyph and petrograph sites, areas utilized by the Lewis and Clark "Corps of Discovery" during the years of 1805-1806, pioneer forts, scenic vistas, natural areas, and much more.  A special focus will be on indigenous culture, religion, oral traditions, and the role of the salmon in their culture, way of life, and survival.  Participants will explore a wealth of heritage treasures like Horse Thief Lake, Stone Henge, Maryhill Museum, Celilo Village, and other places, and gather information that will enrich the classroom learning environment through the development of study units and the enhancement of basic curriculums.

 

Shanghaied In Portland:  Exploring the Infamous Underground & Its Maritime History --- 1 Credit

Graduate: CRN: CI 810 -- Undergraduate: CI 410

INSTRUCTOR:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee:  $140

DATES, TIMES, AND MEETING PLACES: Monday, July 21 (6-9 p.m.) at Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 SE Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (just outside of Boring); & Saturday, July 26 (10-5:30 p.m.) --- meet outside Baja Fresh at Mall 205 on S.E. Washington Street, Portland, Oregon.

    Shanghaiing in the city of Portland represents a unique and little-known maritime history has yet to find its way into the history books.  From the 1850's to as late as the early 1940's,  unsuspecting men were kidnapped and sold to sea captains, giving Portland the dubious notoriety of being the "worst port in the world".  Its survival in the "City of Roses" not only depended upon corruption and the availability of victims, but the existence of a unique underground network that consisted of inner-connecting basements and tunnels that stretched from the waterfront of the Willamette River

located northwest and southwest of the downtown area.   More popularly known

as the "Shanghai Tunnels", this class will take you into segments of this near-forgotten underworld, and provide you a unique glimpse back into this hidden past of the "City of Roses".  Through the use of oral history and exploration, participants will study the "heyday" of the shanghaiing trade, which represent the remnants of this little-told history of human rights violations at its absolute worst.  This class studies this shocking story that is revealed through a series of explorations of catacombs and forgotten

darkened basements.   Unsuspecting victims -- most with little or no ties to

their families, such as sailors, loggers, sheepherders, cowboys, ranchhands, and other working stiffs -- learned first hand about the "darkness and shadows" of this river town that was wide-open because of its unchecked corruption.  An intriguing way to enrich your curriculums and study units with this fascinating course that takes you into the "Underground" as you explore its incredible, fascinating, and shocking secrets.

 

Mt. Hood Wilderness Storytelling Camp --- 1 Credit

Graduate: CRN: CI 810 -- Undergraduate: CI 410

INSTRUCTOR:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee:  $140

DATES, TIMES, AND MEETING PLACES:  Monday, July 28 (9 a.m.-Noon) at Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 SE Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (just outside of Boring); & Tuesday, July 29 (9-4:30 p.m.) -- meet at Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center, 24525 East Welches Road, in the Village of Welches, Oregon.

    This is a special camp that blends the history of the Native Americans of the Northwest with their mythology, along with the stories of the Oregon Trail, pioneer settlement, and tall tales of the Pacific Northwest. Participants will visit some of the actual sites where legends and myths of indigenous people were born, as well as the places where invading emigrants came and certain events took place shaping their own special stories. Participants will learn about the art of storytelling, how to gather and develop stories, understand the role of art in oral tradition, and experience storytelling sessions held in a special building that depicts a Northwest plank lodge.  An excellent way to develop new ideas to expand one's classroom activities, develop special study units, and enhance curriculums for inter-disciplinary study.

 

 

 

Lewis & Clark On the Pacific Coast --- 1 Credit

Graduate: CRN: CI 810 -- Undergraduate: CI 410

INSTRUCTOR:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee:  $140

DATES, TIMES, AND MEETING PLACES:  Monday, July 28 (noon - 3 p.m.) at Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 SE Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (just outside of Boring); & Friday, August 1 (10-5:30 p.m.) --- meet outside the main doors of the Northwest Maritime Museum in Astoria, Oregon.

    The history of the Lewis and Clark Expedition on the Pacific Coast will be explored through this class, which will take the participants to places of history that werecaptured in their journals.  A primary focus will be on the rich multi-cultural heritage of those indigenous people living at the mouth of the Columbia River and along the Pacific Ocean with whom they came into contact during their stay in this area during the Winter of 1805-1806. Participants will visit a wide variety of sites which include the Northwest Maritime Musueum, Fort Clatsop, Fort Columbia, Fort Stevens, the Lewis and Clark Interpretative Center, the Astoria Column, and other sites.  The class will provide educators with the opportunity to develop resources for their classroom, as well as field trip opportunities.  The emphasis will be on gathering information and ideas for cross-curriculum classroom projects.

 

 

Lewis & Clark's Long Beach & Willapa Bay Heritage Sites ---

1 Credit

Graduate: CRN: CI 810 -- Undergraduate: CI 410

INSTRUCTOR:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee:  $140

DATES, TIMES, AND MEETING PLACES: Monday, July 28 (3-6 p.m.) at Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 SE Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (just outside of Boring); & Saturday, August 2  (10-5:30 p.m.) --- meet outside the main doors of the Heritage Museum, 115 SE Lake in Ilwaco, Washington.

    Explore the rich heritage sites of the Long Beach Peninsula and Willapa Bay, in Washington State, where the Lewis and Clark Expedition ventured during 1805-1806.  Study the indigenous people, their ways of life, art, mythology, and religion, as well as the Euro-American explorers, the maritime fur traders, the missionaries, the Oregon Trail pioneers, and the early-day homesteaders, fishermen, oystermen, and resort builders, as well as the anthropologists who came and studied the Native Americans who inhabited this culturally rich region of the Pacific Coast.  Participants will venture to Fort Columbia, Fort Canby, Dead Man's Cove, Leadbetter Point Wildlife Refuge, wetlands, bayside mud habitats, pioneer cemeteries, and towns and settlements like Oysterville, Ocean Park, Illwaco, Nahcotta, and others. Develop some ideas study units and curriculums that blend environmental science, social studies, literature, writing, art, and storytelling.