Cascade Geographic Society's 
SUMMER 2002 Classes
(Graduate & Undergraduate cooperative Education Classes through Portland State University)

Payment Notice: Please note regarding payment for classes: make out one check (to P.S.U.) or pay with your credit card. You need to do this separately for each class. Check or credit card must be processed through Cascade Geographic Society, and must be received prior to the second class date . Payments not received by then may delay official registration and credit/grade. Please call (503) 622-4798 (Michael) or (503) 658-6233 (Nita) for information or registration.

Important Notice: Participants must be prepared to begin on time and bring the following: sack lunch & snacks; $10 for museum fees, if needed; extra money in case of emergencies; proper dress and shoes to fit the weather conditions & season. Optional: camera & film.

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"Lady Washington" Columbia-Willamette River Heritage Voyage
Mount St. Helens for the Curious Educator
Old Columbia River Highway Little-Known Heritage: Western Sites
Old Columbia River Highway Little-Known Heritage: Eastern Sites
MT. Hood:  Exploring A Living Volcano
Infamous Routes & Final Resting Places of Mt. Hood's Oregon Trail's Western Slope
Infamous Routes & Final Resting Places of Mt. Hood's Oregon Trail's Eastern Slope
Ways of the Frontier:  Living History for Educators
Stories of the Ancestors:  Native American Storytelling and Oral heritage of the Natural Landscape
Landscapes of Time & Heritage:  Mt. Hood Sacred Sites & Cultural Areas
Frozen in Stone:  Petroglyphs & Petrographs of Columbia River Gorge
Shanghaied In PORTLAND:  Exploring the Infamous Underground & Its Maritime History
Lighthouses, Landmarks, & the Graveyard of the Pacific: Maritime History & Folklore
Lewis & Clark's Exploration of the Pacific Coast


 

~ Cascade Geographic Society's ~

SUMMER 2002 Classes

(Graduate & Undergraduate cooperative Education Classes through Portland State University)

~ --- ~ --- ~ --- ~ --- ~

Please note regarding payment for classes: make out one check (to P.S.U.)

or pay with your credit card. You need to do this separately for each class. Check or credit card must be processed through Cascade Geographic Society, and must be received prior to the second class date . Payments not received by then may delay official registration and credit/grade.

Please call (503) 622-4798 (Michael) or (503) 658-6233 (Nita) for information or registration.

[IMPORTANT NOTE: Participants must be prepared to begin on time and bring the following: sack lunch (if complimentary lunch is not included in the fee) & snacks; $10 for museum admissions or tour fees, if needed; extra money in case of emergencies; proper dress and shoes to fit the weather conditions & season; & camera & film -- optional.]

~ --- ~ --- ~ --- ~ --- ~

(New as of 06/18/02) "Lady Washington" Columbia-Willamette River Heritage Voyage --- 1 Credit Graduate -- CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CI: 410

Instructor: Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee: $140

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places: June 18 (Tues.), 6-9 p.m. -- Deep Creek Lodge, 25585 S.E. Rebman Road, Deep Creek (near Boring), OR.; & June 22 (Sat.), 10-5:30 p.m. -- -- meet in the parking lot north of Home Depot at

Mall 205, S.E. 102nd & Washington, Portland, OR. (Cost includes all entrance & material fees!

Journey back into heritage of the Northwest on the "Lady Washington", the ship of Captain Robert Gray who was the first non-Indian to both find and sail across the "bar" into the Columbia River. This is a "hands-on" class that will allow the participants a chance to study history firsthand by helping to sail a replica of this explorer's sailing vessel down the Willamette River to the Columbia. You will step back into the days of the square-riggers while you explore the rich multi-cultural maritime history of the Pacific Coast, which highlights the contributions of indigenous people, Euro-American explorers and fur traders, and the race to claim the Old Oregon Country as part of England, Spain, Russia, or America. The class provides educators with a very special opportunity to "man the sails", while studying the historic navigation, technology, and maritime architecture of those who came to the rugged Pacific frontier to trade with the Indians for sea otter pelts and other furs, to map the often treacherous coastal landscape, to search out the fabled Northwest Passage, and to claim this wilderness forever for far-off so-called civilized governments.

Learn about the fascinating heritage for the development of resources for the classroom, as well as field trip opportunities, as you sail Grays Harbor and the Chehalis River. A strong focus will be on gathering information and ideas for cross-curriculum educational projects. So, if you want to know what it was it like during the days of "iron men and wooden ships", take this class and find out.

[Offered Once in 07/01] Mount St. Helens for the Curious Educator -- 1 Credit Graduate -- CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CI: 410

Instructor: Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee: $130

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places: July 8 (Mon.), 9 a.m.-Noon -- Deep Creek Lodge, 25585 S.E. Rebman Road, Deep Creek (near Boring), OR.; & July 9 (Tues.), 9-4:30 p.m. -- -- meet in the parking lot north of Home Depot at

Mall 205, S.E. 102nd & Washington, Portland, OR. (Cost includes all material fees!)

When Mount St. Helens exploded on May 18th, 1980, the natural landscape of this snow-capped peak was transformed into a new mountain once again, like it had in its past eruptions. This class explores Mount St. Helens¹ many thousands of years of eruptive history, with a focus on both the oral traditions of Native American tribes, the journal observations of Euro-American explorers and fur traders, those of the American settlers, and the loggers and miners. Participants will be guided through the mountain¹s north side volcanic terrain and visitor centers, linking the peak's multi-cultural history and oral traditions with modern geologic research. This volcano¹s eruption, not forgetting its daily rumblings from its earthquakes, reminds us that the other once-fiery peaks of the Cascade Mountain Range could possibly reawaken in our lifetime. Participants will be able to develop classroom resource materials and activities that interweave storytelling with geology, geography, environmental studies, history, literature, and more.

[Offered Once in 07/00] Old Columbia River Highway Little-Known Heritage: Western Sites -- 1 Credit Graduate -- CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CI: 410

Instructor: Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee: $125

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places: July 8 (Mon.), Noon-3 p.m. -- Deep Creek Lodge, 25585 S.E. Rebman Road, Deep Creek (near Boring), OR.; & July 11 (Thurs.), 9-4:30 p.m. -- meet at the Columbia Gorge Factory Outlet Mall in front of Mikasa, Troutdale, OR. (Cost includes all material fees!)

The heritage of the Old Columbia River Highway has become legendary throughout the world. Come explore the rich cultural, historical, and scenic marvels of this early-day road and its accompanying landscapes through this unique educational excursion. Constructed between the years of 1913 to 1915, this highway is an early-day engineering wonder that was and still is considered to be one of the most beautiful scenic roadways ever built. It possesses a wealth of heritage sites that are often overlooked, but just waiting to be discovered. Beginning at the mouth of the Sandy River to Multnomah Falls, participants will venture forth, learning about Native American cultures, the Euro-American explorers, the fur traders, the Eden-seeking Oregon Trail pioneers, the homesteaders and land-grabbers, and the gold-crazed miners, as well as who the builders of this special road were, as well as their controversial history. Waterfalls, breath-taking vistas, historic buildings and near-forgotten towns and settlements, as well as natural areas, and much more will unfold before you as you travel this historic roadway while gaining some new ideas and information that should enrich your classroom learning environment and enhance curriculums.

[New as of 07/08/02] Old Columbia River Highway Little-Known Heritage: eastern Sites -- 1 Credit Graduate -- CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CI: 410

Instructor: Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee: $125

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places: July 8 (Mon.), 3-6 p.m. -- Deep Creek Lodge, 25585 S.E. Rebman Road, Deep Creek (near Boring), OR.; & July 12 (Fri.), 9-4:30 p.m. -- meet at the Columbia Gorge Factory Outlet Mall in front of Mikasa, Troutdale, OR. (Cost includes all material fees!)

The scenic Columbia River Highway has some of the most breath-taking sites anywhere in the world. Constructed between the years of 1913 to 1915, early-day road builders pushed this "modern" roadway through the rugged Gorge that plagued Oregon Trail pioneers and early-day homesteaders with its dramatic but treacherous terrain. It was also the ancestral home for many indigenous people, whose heritage sites span this early road. This class will allow participants to explore the many special cultural, historical, and natural sites and features that depict the culture and history of Native Americans, the Lewis and Clark Expedition and other Euro-American explorers, the fur traders, and much more. Visit Multnomah Falls, Cascade Locks, Hood River, and steamboat landings, old military fort sites, and more. Participants will also cross over the Bridge of the Gods and travel Highway 14 to Skamania Lodge and Museum, Beacon Rock, and other sites of interest. Participants will gain new ideas and information to enrich your classroom learning environment and curriculums. A most unique way to learn while exploring.

[Offered Once in 07/01]) MT. Hood: Exploring A Living Volcano --- 1 Credit Graduate -- CRN: CI 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: CI 410

Instructor: Michael P. Jones

Fee: $125

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places: July 15 (Mon.), 9 a.m. -Noon --- Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 S.E. Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (near Boring), Oregon; & July 16 (Tues.), 9-4:30 p.m. -- "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 E. Welches Rd., Welches, Oregon.

Mount Hood is one of the most significant peaks to rise up out of the Cascade Mountain Range. This 11,235-foot Mt. Hood was born some 13 million years ago as a storm of fire and molten lava heaved up its impressive presence on the rugged Cascade skyline and created a geologic wonder.

Since that time, this Mountain, which was called Wy'East by the Native Americans, has been enshrined in rich mythology and legends as it continued to periodically belch streams of smoke, shake from its ever-present earthquakes, and even erupt. The Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804-1806) unknowingly found evidence of a recent eruption along the Sandy River, which had literally buried entire forests which later became known as "Ghost Forests". And during the days of the Oregon Trail, frightened emigrants, traveling over the Mountain's southern flank on the Barlow Trail, witnessed bouts of fire and smoke that exploded from this cantankerous snow-clad cone. Today, Mt. Hood is believed to be awakening from its "sleeping" state, with geologists predicting a major eruption within the next 30 years and as early as 15. With its past eruptions and rich heritage of indigenous people, the educational opportunities are literally unlimited. This class explores some of the indigenous oral traditions associated with Mt. Hood and its volcanic landscape through a series of interpretative tours that will link its diversified multi-cultural history with the near-secret "Ghost Forests" and their picturesque beauty. Participants will be able to develop classroom resource materials and activities that can be interwoven with storytelling to link geology, geography, environmental studies, literature, and much more.

(New as of 07/15/02) Infamous Routes & Final Resting Places of Mt. Hood's Oregon Trail's Wesern Slope --- 1 Credit Graduate -- CRN: CI 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: CI 410

Instructor: Michael P. Jones

Fee: $125

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places: July 15 (Mon.), Noon-3 p.m. --- Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 S.E. Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (near Boring), Oregon; & July 17 (Wed.), 9-4:30 p.m. -- "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 E. Welches Rd., Welches, Oregon.

The Oregon Trail that crossed over Mt. Hood earned a well-deserved reputation for being a dangerous, infamous route that could cost emigrant travelers their life. Yet, it was traveled by the majority of the "overlanders" who came West to the "New Garden of Eden" -- the Willamette Valley. Today, well over 150 years later, you can still travel in the footsteps of these pioneers and learn about this fascinating history first hand. This rugged path through the Cascade Mountains has a rich multi-cultural history, and dates back some ten thousand years of Native American use prior to the coming of the first whites, and still maintains a rugged, breath-taking beauty that proved to be the worst collection of miles in one geographic area than anywhere else on the long journey to Oregon. Participants will visit the infamous Big Laurel Hill -- where emigrants lowered their ³Prairie Schooners² down its steep cliffs with ropes, as well as near-forgotten grave sites, stream ³fords², places where the original wheel ruts and swales have left their mark upon the natural landscape, and many other special sites. Also focused upon will be the effects of the influx of settlers on native peoples in this region, from the 1800s through today, as well as potential options for the future. This is a class that will enhance how you teach the Oregon Trail in your classroom, and will provide a wealth of information to revitalize your curriculum.

(New as of 07/15/02) Infamous Routes & Final Resting Places of Mt. Hood's Oregon Trail's Eastern Slope --- 1 Credit Graduate -- CRN: CI 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: CI 410

Instructor: Michael P. Jones

Fee: $125

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places: July 15 (Mon.), 3-6 p.m. --- Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 S.E. Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (near Boring), Oregon; & July 18 (Thurs.), 9-4:30 p.m. -- "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 E. Welches Rd., Welches, Oregon. The Oregon Trail that crosses over Mt. Hood's rugged eastern slope traverses a picturesque landscape that relatively few travelers visit today. Known as the Barlow Trail, this was a traditional trail utilized for its first ten thousand years by Native Americans. Over 150 years ago it became the first toll road over the Cascade Mountain Range. This class takes its participants on a special journey over this infamous wilderness path, guiding you to a former tollgate, campsites and cabin sites, solitary graves and cemeteries, in addition to an old pioneer hotel, schoolhouse, and much more. This is an opportunity to travel to some little-known sections of the Oregon Trail from the comfort of your car, while learning about the terrible ordeal that thousands of emigrants had to endure in order to reach the Willamette Valley. Also focused upon will be the effects of the influx of settlers on native peoples in this region, from the 1800s through today, as well as potential options for the future. An ideal way to learn about history firsthand, while acquiring many new ideas for your classroom.

(New as of 07/15/02) Ways of the Frontier: Living History for Educators

---

1 Credit

Graduate -- CRN: CI 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: CI 410

Instructor: Michael P. Jones

Fee: $140

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places: July 15 (Mon.), 6-9 p.m. --- Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 S.E. Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (near Boring), Oregon; & July 19 (Fri.), 9-4:30 p.m. -- "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 E. Welches Rd., Welches, Oregon.

The frontier is one of the most exciting aspects of America and the Northwest, especially when you explore living history.

This class will allow you to study frontier times in the Old Oregon Country first hand by studying the lifestyles of these early-day settlers to understand what they had to endure. Participants will explore the lives of the first homesteaders some of the chores they had to endure and tasks they faced through this unique "hands-on" experience of the past that is all situated in a unique 1840's setting. Participants will come to understand the challenges of the Wilderness that taxed the endurance and emotional stability, as well as the physical strength, of the Oregon Trail emigrants and settlers. During those times, survival was based not only upon the intelligence that they employed in their daily tasks and chores, but also on how they cooperated and worked with others. This class will allow one a chance to experience some elements of the workday on the frontier, such as dutch oven cooking, fashioning metal in a blacksmith shop, candle- and soap-making, making fire without the use of matches, splitting shakes, cutting wood with a bowsaw and crosscut saw, fashioning furniture with a foot-powered lathe, and other old-fashioned tools and skills. Learn about constructing temporary shelters and architecture, pioneer clothing, and quilting, as well as about folklore and folkways, village life, and much more. Use historical artifacts and taste pioneer foods and step back into time by visiting a trading post, carpenter's shop, washhouse, school, and other historic structures, including unique shelters. This is one special experience you can take back into your classroom and incorporate into curriculums and units.

(New as of 07/01) Stories of the Ancestors: Native American Storytelling and Oral heritage of the Natural Landscape --- 1 Credit

Graduate -- CRN: CI 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: CI 410

Instructor: Michael P. Jones

Fee: $130

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places: July 22 (Mon.), 9 a.m. -Noon --- Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 S.E. Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (near Boring), Oregon; & July 23 (Tues.), 9-4:30 p.m. -- "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 E. Welches Rd., Welches, Oregon.

The natural areas of North America, as in the rest of the world, traditionally represented more than just places of scenic beauty. Many of these special sites, such as those in the Northwest section of the United States, served not only as traditional cultural and religious sites that were utilized by indigenous people, but were sites where stories were born and were maintained by oral tradition. Although little known or understood by most non-indigenous people, Native American legends and mythology are represented in Nature. This class explores this relationship of storytelling to the natural landscape and how this interplays in American Indian art, as well as the art of the storytelling process itself. Participants will visit a variety of natural features and sites, and will learn about the role of oral tradition as historical and educational tools. Participants will learn how to integrate this information back into their classroom learning environments, how to strengthen their curriculums, and how to develop special units in such subjects as history, writing, art, and environmental science that can involve storytelling.

(New as of 07/01) LANDSCAPEs of Time & Heritage: Mt. Hood Sacred Sites & Cultural Areas --- 1 Credit Graduate -- CRN: CI 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: CI 410

Instructor: Michael P. Jones

Fee: $125

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places: July 22 (Mon.), Noon-3 p.m. --- Deep Creek Lodge, 25580 S.E. Rebman Rd., Deep Creek (near Boring), Oregon; & July 24 (Wed.), 9-4:30 p.m. -- "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 E. Welches Rd., Welches, Oregon.

In every season, the beauty and scenery of the Northwest's natural areas represent some of the most spectacular in all of the world. However, they are more than scenic; they represent important traditional cultural and religious sites that have been utilized by indigenous people for thousands of years. On Mt. Hood these special places still possess the rich heritage of traditional Native American history and mythology. This class explores the sites, way-of-life, and stories and their relationship to the natural landscape for the past 10,000-plus years. Participants will visit a variety of natural sites, in addition to traveling sections of historic indigenous trails. Also studied will be the laws that protect archaeological and cultural sites; the politics of protecting sacred sites; methods to evaluate natural sites for cultural heritage, such as wetlands, riparian areas, rock outcroppings, meadows, etc. Learn how to integrate this information back into the classroom learning environments and strengthen your curriculum.

(New as of 07/22/02) Frozen in Stone: Petroglyphs & Petrographs of Columbia River Gorge --- 1 Credit Graduate -- CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CI: 410

Instructor: Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee: $135

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places: July 22 (Mon.), 3-6 p.m. -- Deep Creek Lodge, 25585 S.E. Rebman Road, Deep Creek (near Boring), OR.; & July 26 (Fri.), 8-3:30 p.m. -- meet at the Columbia Gorge Factory Outlet Mall in front of Mikasa, Troutdale, OR. (Cost includes all entrance & material fees!)

Among the most important features of the scenic Columbia River Gorge are the petroglyphs and pictographs that have been said to have been etched into stone since time immemorial. For over 10,000 years, Native American culture thrived in this spectacular natural landscape where they carved their history and mythology into the cliffs for both their own and future generations. This class explores this incredible living educational landscape, interweaving together cultural and natural history through a series of interpretative tours. Participants will visit places where messages from the past have been etched into stone, telling the stories of Coyote and other animals who became part of the myths and legends of indigenous people of this great river, as well as the history of these First People. A special focus will be on indigenous culture, religion, oral traditions, and the role of the salmon in their culture, way of life, and survival. Participants will explore a wealth of heritage areas like Horse Thief Lake, Celilo Village, and other places of importance that will allow the participants to gather information that will enrich the classroom learning environment through the enhancement of basic curriculums.

(New as of 07/22/02) Shanghaied In PORTLAND: Exploring the Infamous Underground & Its Maritime History --- 1 Credit Graduate -- CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CI: 410

Instructor: Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee: $140

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places: July 22 (Mon.), 6-9 p.m. -- Deep Creek Lodge, 25585 S.E. Rebman Road, Deep Creek (near Boring), OR.; & July 27 (Sat.), 10-5:30 p.m. -- -- meet in the parking lot north of Home Depot at

Mall 205, S.E. 102nd & Washington, Portland, OR. (Cost includes all entrance & material fees! A special dinner is offered after the class!)

Shanghaiing in the city of Portland represents a unique and little-known maritime history has yet to find its way into the history books. From the 1850's to as late as the early 1940's, unsuspecting men were kidnapped and sold to sea captains, giving Portland the dubious notoriety of being the "worst port in the world". Its survival in the "City of Roses" not only depended upon corruption and the availability of victims, but the existence of a unique underground network that consisted of inner-connecting basements and tunnels that stretched from the waterfront of the Willamette River located northwest and southwest of the downtown area. More popularly known as the "Shanghai Tunnels", this class will take you into segments of this near-forgotten underworld, and provide you a unique glimpse back into this hidden past of the "City of Roses". Through the use of oral history and exploration, participants will study the "heyday" of the shanghaiing trade, which represent the remnants of this little-told history of human rights violations at its absolute worst. This class studies this shocking story that is revealed through a series of explorations of catacombs and forgotten darkened basements. Unsuspecting victims -- most with little or no ties to their families, such as sailors, loggers, sheepherders, cowboys, ranchhands, and other working stiffs -- learned first hand about the "darkness and shadows" of this river town that was wide-open because of its unchecked corruption. An intriguing way to enrich your curriculums and study units with this fascinating course that takes you into the "Underground" as you explore its incredible, fascinating, and shocking secrets.

(New as of 07/29/02) Lighthouses, Landmarks, & the Graveyard of the

Pacific Maritime History & Folklore --- 1 Credit

Graduate -- CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CI: 410

Instructor: Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee: $140

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places: July 29 (Mon.), Noon-3 p.m. -- Deep Creek Lodge, 25585 S.E. Rebman Road, Deep Creek (near Boring), OR.; & Aug. 3 (Sat.), 10-5:30 p.m. -- -- meet in the parking lot north of Home Depot at

Mall 205, S.E. 102nd & Washington, Portland, OR. (Cost includes all entrance & material fees!)

Since the coming of the explorers to the Northwest Coast, the area where the Columbia River joins the Pacific Ocean proved to be the most dangerous obstacle along the entire Pacific Coast. Since that time, after the loss of over 2000 ships and boats, and over a thousand lives, the "mouth" of the Columbia has earned the reputation of being the "Graveyard of the Pacific". Yet, in spite of the construction of the Cape Disappointment, North Head, and Willapa Bay lighthouses, this infamous history continued to grow, giving birth to a rich heritage of both fact and fiction. This class focuses on the history of lighthouses along the coast and the oral traditions and folklore that surrounds them, as well as other unique landmarks associated with this important maritime history. Here, where the sea meets this "Great River of the West", this unforgiving place also features some important resources for education. In addition, learn about how Native Americans utilized these same treacherous waters long before the coming of the Euro-Americans, visit a turn-of-the-century government-operated "pesthouse" where sick sailors were forced to stay, the use of the Long Beach Peninsula by early-day pirates, and the role of the fishing and the oyster industry in this region. An interesting way to develop various classroom curriculums and units that blend history, environmental science, literature, writing, and even public speaking.

(New as of 07/29/02) Lewis & Clark's Exploration of the Pacific Coast --- 1 Credit

Graduate -- CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CI: 410

Instructor: Michael P. Jones, M.S.

Fee: $140

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places: July 29 (Mon.), Noon-3 p.m. -- Deep Creek Lodge, 25585 S.E. Rebman Road, Deep Creek (near Boring), OR.; & Aug. 4 (Sun.), 10-5:30 p.m. -- -- meet in the parking lot north of Home Depot at

Mall 205, S.E. 102nd & Washington, Portland, OR. (Cost includes all entrance & material fees!

The Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1804-1806 has proven itself to be one of the more intriguing chapters in American History. The destination of the "Corps of Discovery" was the Pacific Ocean, situated on a coast that was not even part of the United States at the time. We will follow in the wake of their journey, and explore the rich heritage of the Pacific Coast, both the places and its people, that were captured on the pages of their journals. A primary focus will be on the rich multi-cultural heritage of those indigenous people living at the mouth of the Columbia River and along the Pacific Ocean with whom the explorers came into contact during their stay in this area during the Winter of 1805-1806. A secondary focus will be on the effects of contact on native peoples "post Lewis and Clark".

Participants will explore a wide variety of sites, including the Northwest Maritime Museum, Fort Clatsop, Fort Columbia, Fort Stevens, the Lewis and Clark Interpretative Center, the Astoria Column, and others, in both Oregon and Washington. Educators will have an opportunity to develop a variety of resources for their classrooms, as well as exploring field trip opportunities. The emphasis will be on researching and sharing information and ideas for cross-curriculum classroom projects at a variety of educational levels.

 

~~~~ Special Educational Events & Festivals ~~~~

 

"Mount Hood Oregon Trail Quilt Show & Old-Time Fiddlers Jamboree: Past & Present (a heritage exhibition, show, sale, & music festival)"

(Saturday) July 20th & (Sunday) July 21st, 2002

10 a.m. to 10 p.m. in the Lodge and Evergreen Room

at Mt. Hood Village, 65000 East U.S. Highway 26, Brightwood, Oregon

Evening Fiddler's Show -- 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. (Saturday)

Gospel Show -- 10 p.m. to Noon (Sunday)

Mount Hood Loop Vintage & Classic Car Show & Motorcar Tour

(Sunday) July 21st, 2002 --- Noon to 4 p.m.

"Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival & Barlow Trail Days"

(Friday) August 23rd, 2002 --- 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. ,

(Saturday), August 24th, 2002 --- 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.

& (Sunday) August 25th, 2002 --- 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

at Mt. Hood Village, 65000 East U.S. Highway 26, Brightwood, Oregon

Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival Vintage & Classic Car Show & Motorcar Tour

(Sunday) August 25th, 2002 --- Noon to 4 p.m.

"Mount Hood Salmon & Mushroom Festival"

(Saturday) October 5th & (Sunday) October 6th, 2002

10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

at Mt. Hood Village, 65000 East U.S. Highway 26, Brightwood, Oregon

Oregon State Chili Championship --- (Saturday) October 5th

Oregon State Grill Championship --- (Sunday) October 6th

Mount Hood Salmon & Mushroom Festival Vintage & Classic Car Show & Motorcar Tour

(Sunday) October 6th, 2001 --- 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

"Mount Hood Public Lands Clean-Up"

(Saturday) November 9th, 2002

10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Meet in the Evergreen Room

at Mt. Hood Village, 65000 East U.S. Highway 26, Brightwood, Oregon

"Christmas Along The Barlow Trail"

(Saturday) December 14th, 2002 ~ Oregon Trail Heritage Day &

(Sunday) December 15th, 2002 ~ Oregon Trail Heritage Tour

 

CALL (503) 622-4798 FOR MORE DETAILS!