Cascade Geographic Society's 
SPRING 2002 Classes
(Graduate & Undergraduate cooperative Education Classes through Portland State University)

Payment Notice: Please note regarding payment for classes: make out one check (to P.S.U.) or pay with your credit card. You need to do this separately for each class. Check or credit card must be processed through Cascade Geographic Society, and must be received prior to the second class date . Payments not received by then may delay official registration and credit/grade. Please call (503) 622-4798 (Michael) or (503) 658-6233 (Nita) for information or registration.

Important Notice: Participants must be prepared to begin on time and bring the following: sack lunch & snacks; $10 for museum fees, if needed; extra money in case of emergencies; proper dress and shoes to fit the weather conditions & season. Optional: camera & film.

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Lewis & Clark-Native American Trail of Discovery
Old Oregon City Indian & Pioneer History
NEARLY-FORGOTTEN PIONEER CEMETERIES OF THE LOWER WILLAMETTE VALLEY
Native American Storytelling, Potlatching, & Art:
Deschutes River Ghost Towns: 
Exploring MT. ST. HELENS, Ape's Cave & Lava Canyon
Mt. Hood's Oregon TRAIL & The Western Migration
Oregon TRAIL Migration, Settlement, & Graveyards of MT. HOOD's Eastern Flank
PORTLAND Underground:  Maritime History of the INFAMOUS SHANGHAI tunnels
Lewis & Clark Discovery Journey: Lower Columbia River
Lewis & Clark Discovery Journey: Heritage Explorations of Washington's Pacific Coast

 

 

Lewis & Clark-Native American Trail of Discovery:Sauvie Island & Wapato Valley
-- 1 Credit Graduate -- CRN: K4336CG; CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: K4336CU CI: 410
Instructor:  Michael P. Jones, M.S. Fee:  $120

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places:  April 2 (Tues.), 6-9 p.m. -- Rockwood Library, 17917 S.E. Stark, Portland, OR.; & April 6 (Sat.), 10-5:30 p.m. -- meet in the parking lot at the end of the Sauvie Island Bridge on Sauvie Island, OR.   (Cost includes all material fees!)

          During the years 1804 and 1805, the ³Corps of Discovery², lead by Captain Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, explored the Columbia River during the years 1804 and 1805.  They followed the long-established trails and canoe routes of Native Americans, studying and mapping the natural environment, recording in their journals the indigenous people they encountered, as well as the wildlife and natural resources.  Along this ³Great River of the West², the expedition found itself in Wapato Valley (which ranged from the mouth of the Sandy River to Wapato Island (known today as

Sauvie), and beyond to the Coast Range.  These areas represent a land that had been utilized by indigenous people for over 10,000-plus years.  This heritage of both the native people and Lewis and Clark will be explored as you follow in their footsteps and in the wake of their canoes, as you study these diverse histories through a number of special site visits, while you glean information to take back to the classroom to incorporate into curriculums and develop special units.

 

Old Oregon City Indian & Pioneer History
 -- 1 Credit Graduate -- CRN: 4335CG; CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: 4335CU CI: 410
Instructor:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.  Fee:  $120

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places:  April 3 (Wed.), 6-9 p.m. -- Midland Library, 805 S.E. 122nd, Portland, OR.; & April 7 (Sun.), 10-5:30 p.m. -- meet outside in front of the Carnegie Art Center, 606 John Adams, Oregon City, OR.  

(Cost includes all material & entrance fees!)

          Situated adjacent to the Falls on the Willamette River, Old Oregon City possesses a rich heritage of both Native Americans and Euro-Americans, and they are waiting to be explored through a collection of unique interpretative tours.  These excursions will allow participants to visit former sites of Indian villages and camps, fishing sites and cultural areas, as well as early-day pioneer homesteads, steamboat landings, and more, including museums and historic houses.  This class will examine the unique history of both the well-known and little-known sites that have played a significant role in Oregon's and the Northwest's history.  Participants will be exposed to the many issues that confronted the indigenous populations, the fur traders (both the Hudson's Bay Company and American Mountain Men), the Oregon Trail emigrants, and the first settlers, all of whom wanted this land for their own.  This is an ideal way to gain a better understanding of those whose stories have been inscribed in the history books of this region, and learn how to incorporate this information into the development of teaching units and curriculums.  This class will allow educators to develop teaching aids and supplemental resources that will assist them in their teaching profession.

 

NEARLY-FORGOTTEN PIONEER CEMETERIES OF THE LOWER WILLAMETTE VALLEY
-- 1 Credit Graduate -- CRN: K4334CG; CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: K4334CU CI: 410
Instructor:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.
Fee:  $120

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places:  April 9 (Tues.), 6-9 p.m. -- Rockwood Library, 17917 S.E. Stark, Portland, OR.; & April 13 (Sat.), 10-5:30 p.m. -- meet outside in front of the Carnegie Art Center, 606 John Adams, Oregon City, OR.  

(Cost includes all material & entrance fees!)

          To those who followed in the footsteps of Lewis and Clark, the Mountain Men, and the early day missionaries, it was the ³New Garden of Eden².  With its rich, fertile soil, its abundance of game, water, timer, and mild winters, emigrants traveling over the Oregon Trail made the Willamette Valley their home, even forsaking the lure of the California gold fields.  This class explores some of the final resting places of these ³Prairie Schooner² settlers and homesteaders, as well as fur traders, merchants, and empire builders, not forgetting saloon operators, gamblers, madams, and other characters of the vice trade.  You will venture to some of the most important, but-little-known, pioneer cemeteries, where history was changed by the actions of those who dared to alter their lives and relocate to the Old Oregon Country.  This unique interpretive experience allows you to take a good, hard look at this Valley's extraordinary history, and develop some educational insights that will be beneficial to your classroom curriculum.

 

Native American Storytelling, Potlatching, & Art: Heritage Traditions & Culture
-- 1 Credit  Graduate -- CRN: K433CG; CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: K43CU CI: 410
Instructor:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.
Fee:  $120

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places:  April 10 (Wed.), 6-9 p.m. -- Midland Library, 805 S.E. 122nd, Portland, OR.; & April 14 (Sun.), 10-5:30 p.m. 10-5:30 p.m. -- meet at "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 E. Welches Rd., Village of Welches, OR. (Cost includes all material fees!)

          This class blends Native American storytelling and art with the tradition of potlatching in the Northwest.  The participants will be surrounded by artwork and carvings depicting myths and legends, as well as visit natural areas where some of the oral histories of indigenous people were born.  Participants will learn about the art of storytelling, how to gather and develop stories, understand the role of art in oral tradition, and experience storytelling sessions held in a special building that depicts a Northwest plank lodge.  They will also learn about the First People's culture of giving and how this affected the status of an indidual in the tribe.  This is an ideal way to develop new ideas to expand one's classroom activities, develop special study units, and enhance curriculums for inter-diciplinary study.

 

Deschutes River Ghost Towns:  Gold Strikes, Boom Towns, Lost Trails, & Forgotten History
-- 1 Credit  Graduate -- CRN: K4338CG; CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: K4338CU; CI: 410
Instructor:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.
Fee:  $130

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places:  April 16 (Tues.), 6-9 p.m. -- Rockwood Library, 17917 S.E. Stark, Portland, OR.; & April 20 (Sat.), 10-5:30 p.m. -- meet at "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 E. Welches Rd., Village of Welches, OR. (Cost includes all material fees!)

          The ghost towns of Oregon's Deschutes River region, such as Shaniko, represent an exciting but little-known chapter of history.  The miners and gold seekers followed the trails of real and make-believe treasure all which seemed to lead to the "other side of the rainbow".  Those rare gold strikes drew hordes of get-rich-quick dreamers that "sparked" the development of "boom towns" and rough-hewn homestead settlements that sprang-up along the waterways and routes of the Oregon Trail and other emigrant paths.  This class provides a unique opportunity to visit some of those places which time seemed to have forgotten.  These were the places where prospectors and hard-scrabbled miners ignited the flames of rumors that became part of the oral history and folklore of this region.  With the coming of cattle and sheep to the area, livestock represented another form of riches which, unfortunately, was tied to the railroads and, still later, to the roads and highways that crossed and criss-crossed the desert until the landscape swallowed them up and history ignored them.  Participants will travel the land of the Deschutes on some little-known segments of the Oregon Trail and on some desert paths and backroads that lead to a fascinating history.  An ideal way to rediscover history and to gather many new ideas for your classroom that should enrich your curriculums and study units.

 

Exploring MT. ST. HELENS, Ape's Cave & Lava Canyon
-- 1 Credit Graduate -- CRN: K4332CG; CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: K4332CU; CI: 410
Instructor:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.
Fee:  $130

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places:  April 23 (Tues.), 6-9 p.m. -- Rockwood Library, 17917 S.E. Stark, Portland, OR.; & April 27 (Sat.), 10-5:30 p.m. -- meet in the parking lot north of Home Depot at Mall 205, S.E. 102nd & Washington, Portland, OR. (Cost includes all material fees!)

          The eruption of Mt. St. Helens on May 18th, 1980 dramatically changed its natural, contemporary landscape.  With the impact resembling multiple atomic bombs, forests were toppled like they were made of toothpicks, while waterways changed their courses, and lakes transitioned literally into completely different bodies of water.  Yet two significant places on this mountain's volcanic landscape -- Ape¹s Cave and Lava Canyon

-- holds some unique clues to the many thousands of years of past volcanic activity.  This class explores how past volcanic eruptions both created and changed these unique sites, and how educational opportunities can be developed.  Participants will study the history of the indigenous people and their oral traditions associated with these special places, in addition to the Euro-American explorers, fur traders, homesteaders, miners, loggers, and others who exploited this Mountain¹s resources in Ape¹s Cave and Lava Canyon.  Participants will be able to utilize the information gained in this course to develop inter-disciplinary approaches in their classroom learning environment.

 

Mt. Hood's Oregon TRAIL & The Western Migration
-- 1 Credit Graduate -- CRN: K4331CG; CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: K4331CU; CI: 410
Instructor:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.
Fee:  $120

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places:  April 30 (Tues.), 6-9 p.m. -- Rockwood Library, 17917 S.E. Stark, Portland, OR.; & May 4 (Sun.), 10-5:30 p.m. -- meet at "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 E. Welches Rd., Village of Welches, OR. (Cost includes all material fees!)

           The Oregon Trail that traversed over Mt. Hood was an essential "link" in the western migration route for those Eden-seeking "overlanders" coming to the Northwest, and served as an alternative to the raft passage down the Columbia River.  However, this mountain was the most treacherous area in all of the 2,000-plus miles of this difficult emigrant path, and claimed many lives.  Known as the "Barlow Trail" after Samuel Kimbrough Barlow, who charged the travelers a fee to pass over this rugged landscape, this was no road in any sense of the word, but a dangerous path that had been utilized by Native Americans for over 10,000 years.  At "Big Laurel Hill", which was the single worst spot on this route, travelers were forced to lower their wagons down steep cliffs with rawhide ropes, all the while praying that these frayed "lifelines" would not break and cast their fate on the mercy of the rocks below.  Today, over 150 years later, you will follow in the wake of these pioneers and stand in their "footprints" as you study the incredible history of this trail first hand.  A focus will be on the rich multi-cultural history, which dates back to over ten thousand years of Native American use prior to the coming of the first whites, as well as the role of other cultures.  Participants will visit nearly-forgotten grave sites, stream ³fords², places where the original wheel ruts and swales have left their mark upon the natural landscape, and many other special historical places.  This class  will enhance how you teach the Oregon Trail in your classroom, and will provide a wealth of information to re-energize your curriculum and study units. Appropriate for elementary and secondary curriculums.

 

Oregon TRAIL Migration, Settlement, & Graveyards of MT. HOOD's Eastern Flank
-- 1 Credit  Graduate -- CRN: K4330CG; CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: K4330CU; CI: 410
Instructor:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.
Fee:  $120

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places:  May 1 (Wed.), 6-9 p.m. -- Midland Library, 805 S.E. 122nd, Portland, OR.; & May 5 (Sun.), 10-5:30 p.m. -- meet at "Stage Stop Road Interpretative Center", 24525 E. Welches Rd., Village of Welches, OR.   

(Cost includes all material fees!)

    The infamous Oregon Trail segment over Mt. Hood -- known as the "Barlow Trail" -- became famous as well as infamous amongst travelers migrating to the Willamette Valley.  The trail follows a dangerous scenic route from the Columbia River through settlements such as Dufur, Tygh Valley, and Wamic, and then traverses the terrain to Smock Prairie and  up the mountain's rugged eastern landscape to White River, Devil's Half Acre, and Barlow Pass. Utilized by Native Americans for its first ten thousand years, over 150 years ago it became the first toll road over the Cascade Mountain Range. This class will guide its participants on a special interpretative excursion over this historic wilderness path, guiding them to a former tollgate, campsites, little-known routes, cabin sites, solitary graves and cemeteries, in addition to an old frontier hotel, pioneer schoolhouse, an octagon barn, and much more.  This is an opportunity to travel to some little-known sections of the Oregon Trail from the comfort of your car, while learning about the terrible ordeal that thousands of emigrants had to endure in order to reach the Willamette Valley.  This is an ideal way to learn about history firsthand, while acquiring many new ideas for your classroom, whether elementary or secondary.

 

PORTLAND Underground:  Maritime History of the INFAMOUS SHANGHAI tunnels
-- 1 Credit  Graduate -- CRN: K4329CG; CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: K4329CU; CI: 410
Instructor:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.
Fee:  $140

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places:  May 7 (Tues.), 6-9 p.m. -- Rockwood Library, 17917 S.E. Stark, Portland, OR.; & May 11 (Sat.), 10-5:30 p.m. -- meet in the parking lot north of Home Depot at Mall 205, S.E. 102nd & Washington, Portland, OR. (Cost includes all material fees!)

    The "Portland Underground", more popularly known as the "Shanghai Tunnels", represents a little-known maritime history not found in the history books.  Hidden in darkness and within the the cloak of corruption, its story is basically unwritten, and provides a glimpse back into the past of the "City of Roses".  During the "heyday" of the shanghaiing trade, unsuspecting men were kidnapped and sold to sea captains, giving Portland the dubious notoriety of being the "worst port in the world".  This class studies this shocking story that is revealed through a series of explorations of catacombs and forgotten darkened basements which represent the remnants of this little-told history of human rights violations at its absolute worst.  From the 1850's to as late as the early 1940's, unsuspecting victims -- most with little or no ties to their families, such as sailors, loggers, sheepherders, cowboys, ranchhands, and other working stiffs -- learned first hand about the "darkness and shadows" of this river town that was wide-open because of its corruption.  Many of these individuals who frequented such places as saloons, gambling parlors, opium dens, and bordellos, would find themselves dropped through trapdoors into basements, where they were held hostage in make-shift cells for a period of time, until they were finally taken through this underground network out to the wharfs and sold to sea captains ready to "set sail" for the Orient. Once "out to sea", they soon realized that they were just another one of the many victims who were sold for ³blood money² and made Portland the "Shanghai Capital of the World".  Enrich your curriculums and study units with this fascinating course that takes you into the "Underground" as you explore its incredible secrets.

 

Lewis & Clark Discovery Journey: 
Heritage Excursions of the Lower Columbia River To the Pacific Coast
-- 1 Credit Graduate -- CRN: K4355CG; CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CRN4355: KCU; CI: 410
Instructor:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.
Fee:  $140

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places:  May 14 (Tues.), 6-9 p.m. -- Rockwood Library, 17917      S.E. Stark, Portland, OR.; & May 18 (Sat.), 10-5:30 p.m.-- meet in front of Northwest Maritime Museum, Astoria, OR.  

(Cost includes all material & entrance fees!)

          In the wake of the Lewis & Clark "Corps of Discovery", explore the Native American and natural history of the Lower Columbia River from Wapato Valley to the "mouth".  From Sauvie Island to Puget Island, to the Grays River Country and to Astoria, you'll study the rich heritage of the "River of the West" all the way to the Pacific Oregon.  Interpretative tours will guide participants to little-known sites utilized by the Lewis and Clark Corps expedition reflected in their journals in the years 1805 and 1806. The class will provide educators with the opportunity to develop resources for their classroom, in addition to developing special field studies opportunities to some little-known historic places visited by the explorers. Learn about the culture of the indigenous people they met, their way of life, oral traditions, and pre-Euro-American history.  A strong focus will be on gathering information and ideas for cross-curriculum classroom projects. 

 

Lewis & Clark Discovery Journey: Heritage Explorations of Washington's Pacific Coast
-- 1 Credit Graduate -- CRN: K4356CG; CI: 810/Undergraduate -- CRN: K4356CU; CI: 410
Instructor:  Michael P. Jones, M.S.
Fee:  $140

Dates, Times, & Meeting Places:  May 15 (Wed.), 6-9 p.m. -- Midland Library, 805 S.E. 122nd, Portland, OR.; & May 19 (Sun.), 10-5:30 p.m. -- meet in front of Ilwaco Heritage Museum, Ilwaco, OR.  

 (Cost includes all material & entrance fees!)

          Explore the rich heritage sites of Washington's Pacific Coast where the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery camped, hunted, and traded with the Native Americans during their arrival at this destination during the years 1805-1806.  You'll also study the indigenous people who inhabited the Long Beach Peninsula, and Shoalwater and Willapa Bays, with a focus on their ways of life, art, mythology, and religion.  You'll learn about the Euro-American explorers and the maritime fur traders who came before Lewis and Clark, as well as the changes that came after this early-day exploring party with the coming of the missionaries, the Oregon Trail pioneers, and the homesteaders, fishermen, oystermen, and resort builders.  Also studied will be the anthropologists who came and studied the Native Americans who inhabited this culturally rich region of the Pacific Coast.  Participants will venture to Fort Columbia, Fort Canby, Dead Man's Cove, Leadbetter Point Wildlife Refuge, wetlands, bayside mud habitats, pioneer cemeteries, and towns and settlements like Oysterville, Ocean Park, Ilwaco, Nahcotta, and others.  Develop some ideas, study units and curriculums that blend environmental science, social studies, literature, writing, art, and storytelling.